Normanism

Normanism

the traits, customs, and culture of the Normans. — Normanist, n.Normanic, adj.
See also: France
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For a discussion of the academic politics of Normanism and Saxonism, see CANTOR, supra note 3, at 268-86.
Just as Turner and Kemble attempted to purify the English tradition of the degenerative elements of Normanism and Romanism, so Disraeli attempted to purify Toryism of its Liverpool and Peelite excrescences, restoring it to its pristine status as "National Party." It was during his second unsuccessful bid for Parliament at High Wycombe that Disraeli, invoking the principles of Lord Bolingbroke, adumbrated the theories of "primitive" Toryism and "National Party" that he would flesh out in A Vindication and in Coningsby and Sybil: "Rid yourselves of all that political jargon and factious slang of Whig and Tory--two names with one meaning, used only to delude you--and unite in forming a great national party which alone can save the country from impending destruction" (Blake, 90).