Norplant


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Related to Norplant: Implanon

Nor•plant

(ˈnɔrˌplænt, -ˌplɑnt)
Trademark. a long-term contraceptive for women, usu. effective for 5 years, consisting of several small slow-release capsules of progestin implanted under the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
bill proposed in Mississippi sought to mandate the use of Norplant for
Insert Norplant, tie their tubes, put them to work in fast-food chains or sweat shops, and give them a little micro-credit and education if you're feeling generous."
(The punchline of that story is her advice to the six- and eight-year-old girls: that they both go on Norplant as soon as they turn 12.
Second, we need to understand that every chemical birth control agent, such as the pill in all its forms, Norplant, Depo-Provera, etc.
Seizures were not increased among those women who used long-term progesterone contraceptive methods such as Depo-Provera or Norplant, suggesting that those forms of birth control might be a better option for women with epilepsy, Dr.
* Other effective methods of birth control include: birth control pill, hormone implant (Norplant), or hormone injections/shots (Depo-Provera).
Anti-choicers in Britain made an unsuccessful attempt to prevent EC from being dispensed over the counter by placing it under an archaic law that prohibits "procuring a miscarriage." Some anti-choicers have long argued that not just EC but conventional birth-control methods--the pill, Norplant, Depo-Provera and the IUD--are "abortifacients": In northern Kentucky anti-choice extremists are campaigning to force one local health board to reject Title X family-planning funds; according to the Lexington Herald-Leader, the board's vote, scheduled for June 19, is too close to call.
More recently, some judges have included use of the long-term contraceptive Norplant as a condition of probation for defendants convicted of child abuse and related offenses.
That was the birth of CRACK (Children Requiring A Caring Kommunity), a nonprofit organization that offers $200 in cash to addicts who agree to be sterilized or undergo long-term contraception like Norplant, which is surgically imbedded under the skin.
The case was brought by Jennifer Erickson and other female employees of Bartell Drug Co., which decided not to cover prescription contraceptives--including birth-control pills, Norplant, Depo-Provera, and intrauterine devices--under its prescription benefit plan for nonunion employees.