Norse


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Norse

 (nôrs)
adj.
1. Of or relating to medieval Scandinavia or its peoples, languages, or cultures.
2. Of or relating to Norway or its people, language, or culture.
3. Of, relating to, or being the branch of the North Germanic languages that includes Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese.
n.
1.
a. The people of Scandinavia; the Scandinavians.
b. The people of Norway; the Norwegians.
c. Speakers of Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese.
2.
b. Any of the West Scandinavian languages, especially Norwegian.

[Probably Dutch Noorsch, Scandinavian, from Middle Dutch Noortsch, from nort, north; see ner- in Indo-European roots.]

Norse

(nɔːs)
adj
1. of, relating to, or characteristic of ancient and medieval Scandinavia or its inhabitants
2. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Norway
n
3. (Languages)
a. the N group of Germanic languages, spoken in Scandinavia; Scandinavian
b. any one of these languages, esp in their ancient or medieval forms. See also Proto-Norse, Old Norse
4. (Peoples) the Norwegians
5. (Peoples) the Vikings
6. (Historical Terms) the Vikings

Norse

(nɔrs)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to medieval Scandinavia, its inhabitants, or their speech.
n.
2. (used with a pl. v.) the inhabitants of medieval Scandinavia; the Norsemen.
[1590–1600; perhaps < Dutch noorsch,noord north]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Norse - an inhabitant of ScandinaviaNorse - an inhabitant of Scandinavia  
Scandinavia - a group of culturally related countries in northern Europe; Finland and Iceland are sometimes considered Scandinavian
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Viking - any of the Scandinavian people who raided the coasts of Europe from the 8th to the 11th centuries
berserk, berserker - one of the ancient Norse warriors legendary for working themselves into a frenzy before a battle and fighting with reckless savagery and insane fury
2.Norse - a native or inhabitant of NorwayNorse - a native or inhabitant of Norway  
Kingdom of Norway, Noreg, Norge, Norway - a constitutional monarchy in northern Europe on the western side of the Scandinavian Peninsula; achieved independence from Sweden in 1905
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
3.Norse - the northern family of Germanic languages that are spoken in Scandinavia and IcelandNorse - the northern family of Germanic languages that are spoken in Scandinavia and Iceland
Germanic, Germanic language - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages; members that are spoken currently fall into two major groups: Scandinavian and West Germanic
Danish - a Scandinavian language that is the official language of Denmark
Icelandic - a Scandinavian language that is the official language of Iceland
Norwegian - a Scandinavian language that is spoken in Norway
Swedish - a Scandinavian language that is the official language of Sweden and one of two official languages of Finland
Faeroese, Faroese - a Scandinavian language (closely related to Icelandic) that is spoken on the Faroe Islands
Adj.1.Norse - of or relating to Scandinavia or its peoples or cultures; "Norse sagas"; "Norse nomads"
2.Norse - of or relating to Norway or its people or culture or language; "Norwegian herring"

Norse

adjective see mythology
Translations
altnordisch

Norse

[nɔːs]
A. ADJnórdico, escandinavo
Norse mythologymitología f nórdica
B. N (Ling) → nórdico m

Norse

[ˈnɔːrs]
adj [mythology, gods,legends] → scandinave
n (= language) → norrois m

Norse

adj mythologyaltnordisch
n (Ling) Old NorseAltnordisch nt

Norse

:
Norseman
n (Hist) → Normanne m, → Wikinger m
Norsewoman
n (Hist) → Normannin f, → Wikingerin f

Norse

[nɔːs] nlingua norrena
References in classic literature ?
In old Norse times, the thrones of the sea-loving Danish kings were fabricated, saith tradition, of the tusks of the narwhale.
We could not, in all conscience, have picked out a better day for our regatta had we had the free choice of all the days that ever dawned upon the lonely struggles and solitary agonies of ships since the Norse rovers first steered to the westward against the run of Atlantic waves.
Take up the literature of 1835, and you will find the poets and novelists asking for the same impossible gift as did the German Minnesingers long before them and the old Norse Saga writers long before that.
The Assistant Commissioner watched the bullet head; the points of that Norse rover's moustache, falling below the line of the heavy jaw; the whole full and pale physiognomy, whose determined character was marred by too much flesh; at the cunning wrinkles radiating from the outer corners of the eyes - and in that purposeful contemplation of the valuable and trusted officer he drew a conviction so sudden that it moved him like an inspiration.
The exploits of this whole race of Norse sea-kings make one of the most remarkable chapters in the history of medieval Europe.
While unreservedly and strongly recommended for both community and academic library Metaphysical Studies collections in general, and Viking Mythology supplemental studies lists in particular, it should be noted for students and non-specialist general readers with an interest in the subject that "Odin: Ecstasy, Runes, & Norse Magic" is also available in a digital book format (Kindle, $11.
Norton and Company, New York, 2017, 293 pages), Gaiman readily admits to savoring the flavor and scope of the Norse tales.
These are the inspirational reference points which led to the development of Project Norse.
Critique: Specifically designed and deftly written for young readers age 8 to 12, "National Geographic Treasury of Norse Mythology: Stories of Intrigue, Trickery, Love, and Revenge" will prove to be a high demand addition to school and community library collections.
KPMG Capital said it has taken an equity stake in Norse Corp.
Norse is the latest investment from KPMG Capital's first global fund focused on accelerating innovation in data and analytics.
Other chapters develop Ahronson's previous studies of place-names with the Old Norse pap- element (Chapter 3) and cross-forms common to the Hebrides and Iceland (Chapter 7).