Northwest Territory

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Northwest Territory

Formerly Old Northwest.
A historical region of the north-central United States extending from the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to the Great Lakes. The area was ceded to the United States by the Treaty of Paris in 1783. It was officially designated a territory in 1787 and later split up into the territories and present-day states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota. Control over the territory was a major issue in the War of 1812.

Northwest Territory

n
(Placename) See Old Northwest

North′west Ter′ritory


n.
the region north of the Ohio River and east of the Mississippi, organized by Congress in 1787, comprising present-day Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and the E part of Minnesota.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some years ago, long before Alberta had arisen to the dignity of a province, prohibition was popularly supposed to be rigidly enforced in the North-West Territory. It was possible, however, for a man with a thirst to secure a permit which entitled him to ship in a certain amount of liquid refreshments.
Although Middleton had ordered him to stand fast in Battleford, Otter telegraphed Edgar Dewdney, lieutenant-governor of the North-West Territory, for permission to "punish Poundmaker" and duly got it.
The majority ruled that the 1870 Rupert's Land and North-West Territory Order (the 1870 Order), which covered the territory that eventually became Alberta, did not expressly provide for legislative bilingualism, unlike the 1870 Manitoba Act, creating that province, which expressly did.
But he GTR remained on the verge of bankruptcy, and the Barings helped to engineer the 1867 Act of Confederation -- and the acquisition of the North-West Territory, largely to secure its investments.

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