Northern Kingdom


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Northern Kingdom

See Israel2.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
But already the fame of Oxford had reached the northern kingdom, and Barbour was anxious to share in the treasures of learning to be found there.
Perth was once considered the capital of Scotland and was nicknamed the "Fair City" after Sir Walter Scott described the city as "The fairest portion of the northern kingdom".
IN the quarter century of his reign, King Charles II never ventured into his northern kingdom.
From a March 2017 international and multidisciplinary conference in Munich, 17 papers explore the fall of the Northern Kingdom of Israel to the Assyrian Empire during the ninth century BCE.
Finkelstein believes that it was the northern kingdom that was the stronger of the two.
After King Solomon died, Israel was divided by a civil war into the Northern Kingdom called Israel and Ephraim (capital: Samaria) and the Southern Kingdom called Judah (capital: Jerusalem).
Her affection for the animals and landscapes of Vermont's northern kingdom is apparent throughout A Stitch in Time, but what will really win over readers is her novel's heroine.
"When we looked at Langley's incredible, historic interior, its battlements and its grounds, and compared these to scenes from A Game of Thrones, we realised there could not be a better place in which to create a Northern Kingdom experience.
There's an essay on Philip Pullman's The Golden Compass and an essay on Austrian travel writer Ida Pfeiffer's 19th century visit to Iceland; there's an essay on black metal music (because it's influenced by Norse sagas) and one on the Greek myth of Hyperborea; there's an essay on Vladimir Nabokov's imaginary northern kingdom of Zembla in Pale Fire and one on the attempts by Victorian mesmerists to locate Sir John Franklin.
Amit explains the book of Judges in terms of a pre-deuteronomistic Judahite indictment of the northern kingdom dating to the eighth century b.c.e.
As for Scotland, Edward's attempts at conquest led to a deepening of the fissures between England and the northern kingdom. This is a thoroughly readable study, written in a lively and accessible manner and full of fresh insights into a crucial period of British history.
The cult of YHWH in the Northern Kingdom of Israel, the subject of chapter 6, was of quite a different nature than that in Judah.

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