dependent clause

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dependent clause

A dependent clause (also called a subordinate clause) is a clause that relies on the information from an independent clause to form a complete, logical thought. As such, it cannot stand on its own to form a sentence.
There are three types of dependent clause: noun clauses, relative clauses (also called adjective clauses), and adverbial clauses.
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dependent clause

n.
A clause that cannot stand alone as a full sentence and functions as a noun, adjective, or adverb within a sentence. Also called subordinate clause.

dependent clause

n
(Grammar) grammar another term for subordinate clause
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dependent clause - a clause in a complex sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and that functions within the sentence as a noun or adjective or adverb
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
restrictive clause - a subordinate clause that limits or restricts the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
descriptive clause, nonrestrictive clause - a subordinate clause that does not limit or restrict the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
3 used to introduce a noun clause serving especially as the subject or object of a verb <He said that he wasn't afraid.
Nevertheless, the syntactic context allows for another interpretation, with the verb PRAY followed by a subordinate noun clause, functioning as the verb's object, in which the pronoun has the function of the subject and the following verb is in the subjunctive mood, showing modality (it is optative, i.
This sentence contains two independent clauses, three adverb clauses, one noun clause, and one adjective clause.
In a different language, the closest equivalent to the verb ensure might take only a direct object, not a noun clause complement.
The newly edited Old English text often retains Assmann's German punctuation, for example commas before thaet introducing a noun clause and before the introducing an adjectival clause with another comma at the end of that clause, all in the first paragraph.
There is a difference between saying "Rembrandt fashioned himself" and "Rembrandt fashioned his self": the reflexive pronoun in the first predicate has merely deictic force, whereas in the second, the noun clause has referential force and implies commitment to an entity, the self.
2) The verb of the principal clause, onguldon, has a noun clause as its object; the noun clause is anticipated by a demonstrative pronoun, thaes (the genitive of paet(9)), to which it is in apposition: 'Their descendants have afterwards been grievously punished for this, (namely) that they ate that food against the Eternal One's command.