Numa Pompilius


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Numa Pompilius

(ˈnjuːmə pɒmˈpɪlɪəs)
n
(Biography) the legendary second king of Rome (?715–?673 bc), said to have instituted religious rites
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Early calendars marked the start of the new year in March, but when the second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius, rose to the throne in 713 BC, he synchronized the calendar to the lunar year.
We might say, with respect to these particular writings at least, that Jefferson acts as Romulus to Franklin's Numa Pompilius.
In the first book of Livy's history, Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome (to whom James V was compared on at least one occasion), founds a series of religious rites by way of imposing discipline on the Roman people.
Religion stands in a niche separating two scenes; above her two Victories hold the bust of Numa Pompilius. The arms above are Cardinal San Giorgio's, who built the palace.
Numa Pompilius had divided the Roman society into four classes.
No es el guardian del bosque de Nemi como aparece en Frazer ni mucho menos el Numa Pompilius de Plutarco.
A law against the killing of kin (patricide), attributed to Numa Pompilius, suggests that during the regal period the ruler had power of life and death over his subjects and that homicide constituted an attack on his authority as well as an offense against the gods.
His successor Numa Pompilius tried to solve the problem by creating January and February and adding a new month of Mercedinus to fall every other year.
The second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius (715-673 BC), proclaimed in his Lex Regia (Royal Law), 'It is forbidden to bury a pregnant woman before her foetus has been cut out of the womb ...'.
In Plutarch's bio of Numa Pompilius, the successor to Rome's founder, Romulus, I ran across an interesting passage:
A sampling of essay topics: credibility and credulity in Plutarch's Life of Numa Pompilius, divine sons--Aeneas and Jesus in Hebrews, notes on divesting and vesting in The Hymn of the Pearl, and Ante-Nicene preaching in recent literature.
And the forest of Nemi, where Numa Pompilius went to seek counsel from the nymph Egeria so that he could write his decrees.