Numantia


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Numantia

(njuːˈmæntɪə)
n
(Placename) an ancient city in N Spain: a centre of Celtic resistance to Rome in N Spain; captured by Scipio the Younger in 133 bc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The Romans, in order to hold Capua, Carthage, and Numantia, dismantled them, and did not lose them.
"The Ingratitude Revenged" was not nonsense, nor was there any in "The Numantia," nor any to be found in "The Merchant Lover," nor yet in "The Friendly Fair Foe," nor in some others that have been written by certain gifted poets, to their own fame and renown, and to the profit of those that brought them out;' some further remarks I added to these, with which, I think, I left him rather dumbfoundered, but not so satisfied or convinced that I could disabuse him of his error."
The Voyage to Parnassus / Numantia, a Tragedy / The commerce of Algiers.
(1990): "Un vaso pintado y tres dataciones de C-14 procedentes del Cerro de San Pelayo (Martinamor, Salamanca)", Numantia, III, pp.
Among their topics are Italian Celticisms: a second (unpublished) version of Giovanni Fabbroni's Antichi Abitatori d'Italia (1803), the invention of Numantia and Emporion: archaeology and the regeneration of Spanish and Catalan nationalisms after the crisis of 1898, Illyrian autochthonisms and the beginnings of South Slav nationalisms, in the West Balkans, and shifting discourses of heritage and identity in Turkey: Anatolianist ideologies and beyond.
Nec Scipio Affricanus, excisa Numantia, rei publicae romanae profuisset, ni eodem tempore Publius Nasica Tiberio Gracco legem agrariam ferenti subselliorum fragmentis vitam erripuisset.
Among the clues that we are dealing with a transcript are the misspellings: "Numatia's" (for "Numantia's), "tatalize" ("tantalize"), "imortall" ("immortall"), and so forth.
The River Duero clearly spells out the ironic parallels between the fall of the ancient Celtic city of Numantia and the future rise of Habsburg Spain.