nursing home

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nursing home

n.
A private establishment that provides living quarters and care for chronically ill, usually elderly patients.

nursing home

n
1. (Medicine) a private hospital or residence staffed and equipped to care for aged or infirm persons
2. (Medicine) Brit a private maternity home

nurs′ing home`


n.
1. a residential institution caring for the aged or infirm.
2. Chiefly Brit. a small private hospital.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nursing home - an institution where people are cared fornursing home - an institution where people are cared for; "a home for the elderly"
institution - an establishment consisting of a building or complex of buildings where an organization for the promotion of some cause is situated
Translations
sanatorium
plejehjem
hoitokoti
starački dom
老人ホーム
양로원
zasebna bolnišnica
sjukhem
สถานดูแลคนชรา
nhà dưỡng lão

nursing home

ncasa di cura, clinica

nursing home

دَارُ الْتِمْرِيضِ sanatorium plejehjem Pflegeheim γηροκομείο ancianato, hogar de ancianos hoitokoti maison de repos starački dom casa di riposo 老人ホーム 양로원 verzorgingstehuis pleiehjem dom opieki casa de repouso, lar de terceira idade дом престарелых sjukhem สถานดูแลคนชรา huzurevi nhà dưỡng lão 疗养院
References in classic literature ?
He exclaimed, "Schlegels again!" and as if to complete chaos, Dolly said, "Oh no, the matron of the nursing home has written instead of her."
Forwarded through the matron of that nursing home. Now, the question is--"
She got twice or three times into the nursing home. Presumably she is awaiting developments."
Nursing homes should also consider the relationship between different levels of care on campus.
These numbers, the most recent available, might seem statistically small when measured against the fact that nationwide there are roughly 1.5 million persons age 65 or older in nursing homes and another 800,000 in assisted living facilities, according to the American Health Care Association.
Federal legislation adopted during the previous 40 years has equipped our government with the means to tackle many of the problems facing nursing homes. The National Health Service Corps (NHSC), for example, could recruit skilled nurses and nursing assistants in areas with staffing shortages to help ease that situation today.
One-hundred and fifty-one long term care facilities have received "AAA" status on a list of the nation's top-performing nursing homes, according to the list's creator, CareScout.
Nursing homes in most states cope with inadequate Medicaid reimbursement and the threat of worse, but California lawmakers have joined the intergovernmental transfer (IGT) parade--with something extra: an ambitious plan to link the increased funding to improved quality of care.
In a case of "Not Welcome Here," the American Association of Retired Persons in Illinois is up in arms over the fact that recent parolees are sometimes placed in nursing homes, side by side with vulnerable elderly residents.
(4,5) The residents of nursing homes usually have significant levels of debilitation, often arising from numerous chronic conditions.
More than 500 nursing homes nationwide have repeatedly been cited within the past five years for life-endangering violations, according to a recent study by Gannett News Service.
In 1991, the Center for Health Systems Research and Analysis at the University of Wisconsin--Madison developed its first set of quality indicators (QIs) to highlight areas of concern in nursing homes that could indicate potential quality problems needing further review and investigation.

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