Nuxalk


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Nuxalk

(nuːˈxɒlk)
n
(Peoples) a member of a Salishan Native Canadian people of British Columbia. Formerly called: Bella Coola
[from Salish]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
These communities are currently constituted, from south to north, as the Wuikinuxv, Heiltsuk, Nuxalk, Kitasoo/Xai'xais, Gitga'at, Haisla, and Metlakatla First Nations.
The Coastal First Nations include Wuikinuxv Nation, Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xaixais, Nuxalk Nation, Gitga'at, Metlakatla, Old Massett, Skidegate, and Council of the Haida Nation": Coastal First Nations Great Bear Initiative, "Coastal First Nations", online: <www.coastalfirstnations.ca>.
Nuxalk Chief Wally Webber is happy that a traditional mask that was used as a Super Bowl wager by the Seattle Art Museum will be used in Bella Coola for a potlatch in September.
A quote from a Nuxalk Nation chief states, "We must protect the forests for our children, grandchildren and children yet to be born.
(6) The native Salishan languages of western North America (such as Nuxalk, or Bella Coola) contain bewilderingly long clusters of voiced and unvoiced consonants without intervening vowels, thus calling into question the very notion of a syllable-based analysis of language.
Kramer presents a compelling framework from which to understand the complex layers of cultural "theft" at the hands of non-Natives and why the Nuxalk people of British Columbia are so angry and protective of their tangible and intangible culture (Switchbacks).
Observa-se um declinio constante no uso de alimentos tradicionais, acompanhado pelo aumento no consumo de alimentos ricos em calorias e pobres em nutrientes essenciais, assim como Kuhnlein (1992) observou para povos Nuxalk no Canada.
The Salish peoples include the Siletz and Wascopum in Oregon; the Taidnapum Cowlitz, Quinault, S'Klallam, and Skagit of Washington; the Wenatchee and Kootenai of Montana and Idaho; and the Stl'atl'imx, Gitskan, Okanagan, and Nuxalk of British Columbia.
See for example Anne Makepeace, Coming to Light, 85 min., Reading, PA: Bullfrog Films, 2000, video recording (hereafter cited as Coming to Light (videorecording)), as well as Ruth Kirk, Tradition and Change on the Northwest Coast: The Makah, Nuu-chah-nulth, Southern Kwakiutl and Nuxalk (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1986), 15; Jolene Rickard, "The Occupation of Indigenous Space as 'Photograph,'" in Native Nations: Journeys in American Photography, ed.