Nyanja


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Nyan·ja

 (nyăn′jə)
n.
A Bantu language spoken in Malawi and neighboring areas.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Nyanja

(ˈnjændʒə)
npl -ja or -jas
1. (Peoples) a member of a Negroid people of central Africa, living chiefly in Malawi
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Bantu group of the Niger-Congo family. Nyanja forms the basis of a pidgin used as a lingua franca in central Africa
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The claim came hot on the heels of a stinging allegation that Jubilee secretary general Raphael Tuju and former Limuru MP George Nyanja planned to raise funds for the rebuilding of the burnt Kiambaa Kenya Assemblies of God Church in Uasin Gishu.
Questionnaires were administered in local languages appropriate to each of the four countries (Malawi: Chichewa and Tumbuka; Nigeria: English, Hausa, Igbo, and Yoruba; Uganda: English, Ateso-Karamajong, Luganda, Lugbara, Luo, Swahili, Runyankole-Rukiga, and Runyoro-Rutoro; and Zambia: English, Bemba, Kaonde, Lozi, Lunda, Luvale, Nyanja, and Tonga).
It is only Shona and Ndebele that became the native languages taught in the education system whilst the rest such as Sotho, Nyanja, and Kalanga suffer a calculated negligence (Muchenje et al, 2015).
Dubai-based Zambian artist Victor Sitali's latest show is titled Okongola, which means 'beautiful' in the Zambian language, Nyanja. The young artist, who is known for his portraits, is presenting two new series of paintings that explore the idea of beauty in different ways.
The interviews were conducted in a private office in the study hospital by female research assistants fluent in the respondents' languages (Nyanja, English and Bemba), and typically lasted 30 minutes.
Zoona, which means 'real' in the local language Nyanja, was born.
The one notable attempt of the ruling government to be inclusive has been making both Shona and Ndebele official languages and mediums of teaching in schools, whilst other minority languages such as Nyanja, Shangani and Kalanga are officially recognised as mediums of communication mainly on radio stations (Muzondidya 2008, Ndlovu-Gatsheni 2012).
(159) The languages of Zambia are as diverse as the people and include English, Bemba, Nyanja, Tonga, Lozi, Lunda, Kaonde, Lala and Luvale.