Nyanja


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Nyan·ja

 (nyăn′jə)
n.
A Bantu language spoken in Malawi and neighboring areas.

Nyanja

(ˈnjændʒə)
npl -ja or -jas
1. (Peoples) a member of a Negroid people of central Africa, living chiefly in Malawi
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Bantu group of the Niger-Congo family. Nyanja forms the basis of a pidgin used as a lingua franca in central Africa
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dubai-based Zambian artist Victor Sitali's latest show is titled Okongola, which means 'beautiful' in the Zambian language, Nyanja.
Other measures include widening of the Nyanja Kamara bridge, improved road marking with cat's eye reflectors and signage and installation of guard rails.
Rating descriptions for the five point hedonic scales used in the cooked porridge and uncooked ingredient set evaluations were provided in the Zambian dialects of Nyanja, Bemba, Tonga, and Lozi, as well as in English.
Zoona, which means 'real' in the local language Nyanja, was born.
The one notable attempt of the ruling government to be inclusive has been making both Shona and Ndebele official languages and mediums of teaching in schools, whilst other minority languages such as Nyanja, Shangani and Kalanga are officially recognised as mediums of communication mainly on radio stations (Muzondidya 2008, Ndlovu-Gatsheni 2012).
159) The languages of Zambia are as diverse as the people and include English, Bemba, Nyanja, Tonga, Lozi, Lunda, Kaonde, Lala and Luvale.
The consultant should be fluent in English as well as Nyanja and Bemba.
However, the Nyanja have explicit ones like, "He has died" cited by Burns (1976: 153) as a victory statement and taunting of the loser.
One such volume of missionary scholarship, the Dictionary of the Nyanja Language (1929) by Alexander Hetherwick et al.
The name Malawi comes from the Maravi, an old name of the Nyanja people that inhabit the area.
One of the main threats to the health of the Mozambican side of the lake is illegal migrant fishermen from Malawi,' explains Chingomanje in a mixture of broken Portuguese and the local Nyanja dialect.