nymphic

nymphic

(ˈnɪmfɪk) or

nymphical

adj
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) myth relating to a nymph
2. (Zoology) zoology relating to an underdeveloped form of adult insect
References in periodicals archive ?
The evening's second expressive movement was a performance by earth-goddess dancer Dages Keates, whose too-brief sensuous organic movements and swaying limbs evoked 19th century nymphic statuary, and seemed to conjure up in seance the prototypical 20th century modern dance pioneers Isadora Duncan and Ruth St.
Beyond the colors of her visage, mythic or, more specifically, nymphic qualities dominate Temple's bodily description.
For Faulkner, viewing The Metamorphosis would not only recall Ovid but would also suggest the symbiotic relationship between the sculpture before him and the nymphic girl he envisioned near the fountain in the Luxembourg Gardens.
Now I wish to introduce the following idea: Between the age limits of nine and fourteen there occur maidens who, to certain bewitched travelers, twice or many times older than they, reveal their true nature which is not human but nymphic (that is demoniac); and these chosen creatures I propose to designate as nymphets.
18) In one such incident of nymphic misperception, a "tender pattern of nudity" ("what looked like a nymphet in the act of undressing before a co-operative mirror") is really "the disgusting lamp-lit bare arm of a man in his underclothes reading his paper by the open window in the hot, damp, hopeless summer night" (20).
On the other hand, Humbert realizes that he has damaged the girl and that, in addition to vulgar teenage mannerisms, she possesses virtues overlooked by his nymphic obsessions: cheerfulness, generosity, equanimity.
Rather than violently imposing his nymphic vision on reality, he has learned to perceive and express a truth about the girl through his imaginative effort.
Between the age limits of nine and fourteen there occur maidens who, to certain bewitched travelers, twice or many times older than they, reveal their true nature which is not human, but nymphic (that is, demoniac); and these chosen creatures I propose to designate as "nymphets.
Blinded by the shock of recognition, Humbert fails to read this scene for anything but the nymphic, although the demonic openly confronts him.
Her miscellaneous story avoids melodramatic progressions from classicism to romanticism or from oppression to liberty or from gender bias to nymphic sexuality or even from Mary Astell to Mary Wollstonecraft.