Nairobi

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Nai·ro·bi

 (nī-rō′bē)
The capital and largest city of Kenya, in the south-central part of the country. Founded in 1899, it became the seat of government for British East Africa in 1905 and capital of independent Kenya in 1963.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Nairobi

(naɪˈrəʊbɪ)
n
(Placename) the capital of Kenya, in the southwest, at an altitude of 1650 m (5500 ft): founded in 1899; became capital in 1905; commercial and industrial centre; the Nairobi National Park (a game reserve) is nearby. Pop: 2 818 000 (2005 est)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Nai•ro•bi

(naɪˈroʊ bi)

n.
the capital of Kenya, in the SW part. 3,000,000.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Nairobi - the capital and largest city of KenyaNairobi - the capital and largest city of Kenya; a center for tourist safaris
Kenya, Republic of Kenya - a republic in eastern Africa; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1963; major archeological discoveries have been made in the Great Rift Valley in Kenya
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Nairobi

[naɪˈrəʊbɪ] NNairobi m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Nairobi

[naɪˈrəʊbi] nNairobi
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Nairobi

[naɪˈrəʊbɪ] nNairobi f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In a way, a name is the ultimate adoption, and as I thought about Nai'posha, which translates to 'the place of rough waters', in the Maasai language, and Nairobi, which is derived from Engore Nyrobi, Maasai for 'place of cold waters'; and Subukia, translated from the Maasai word Isipuku meaning 'hilly land' and on to Nyeri, which derives its name from Nyiro, the Maasai word that translates to dark loam in reference to the soil.
Nairobi was first named 'Enkare Nyrobi' from the Masaai phrase cool water.
The construction of the railway attracted people to a number of new depots, the largest of which was built on an area of swampy ground known as Nyrobi; Left: pastoralists drawing water from a well in northern Kenya; Below: members of the Jubaland Boundary Commission Escort on Lamu Island around 1926