Nyssa aquatica


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Related to Nyssa aquatica: Nyssa sylvatica, Quercus lyrata
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Noun1.Nyssa aquatica - columnar swamp tree of southeastern to midwestern North America yielding pale soft easily worked woodNyssa aquatica - columnar swamp tree of southeastern to midwestern North America yielding pale soft easily worked wood
tupelo tree, tupelo - any of several gum trees of swampy areas of North America
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nontidal forests were dominated by water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.), Carolina ash (Fraxinus caroliniana Mill.), Ogeechee tupelo (Nyssa ogeche Bartr.
The Water Tupelo, Nyssa aquatica, and the Black Gum, Nyssa sylvatica, can be found throughout the state, and both trees have attractive autumn foliage.
Near a landing at the end of a road, I looked across the river and saw what seemed to be a water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica)--e biggest water tupelo I had ever seen.
The study area was characterized by varying degrees of hurricane damage (designated as low, moderate, and high), two forest types [bottomland hardwood ridges and slightly lower baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)-tupelogum (Nyssa aquatica) swales], and two tree sizes (pulpwood and sawtimber) (see Helm 1995; Salyer 1995) and located south of Interstate 10 between the Atchafalaya and Mississippi Rivers in Iberville Parish, Louisiana.
Nyssa aquatica ("grows in water") is known as water tupelo, tupelo gum and swamp tupelo.
Stones of Nyssa aquatica are sharply ribbed with raised bundles, i.e., vascular strands run along the rib crests.
Nyssa aquatica L., dominant in the Big Thicket swamp, was absent from the corresponding swamps at Caddo Lake.
Horseshoe Lake is a shallow, eutrophic, oxbow lake surrounded by emergent wetlands, and swamps dominated by bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) and tupelo (Nyssa aquatica).
In our study, the upstream stand was composed almost exclusively of baldcypress and water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.), whereas the downstream area supported these species in addition to swamp red maple (Acer rubrum var.