oat

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oat

 (ōt)
n.
1. often oats(used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. Any of various grasses of the genus Avena, especially A. sativa, widely cultivated for their edible grains.
b. The grain of any of these plants, used as food and fodder.
2. A musical pipe made of an oat straw.

[Middle English ote, from Old English āte.]

oat

(əʊt)
n
1. (Plants) an erect annual grass, Avena sativa, grown in temperate regions for its edible seed
2. (Plants) (usually plural) the seeds or fruits of this grass
3. (Plants) any of various other grasses of the genus Avena, such as the wild oat
4. (Instruments) poetic a flute made from an oat straw
5. feel one's oats informal
a. to feel exuberant
b. to feel self-important
6. get one's oats slang to have sexual intercourse
7. sow one's oats sow one's wild oats to indulge in adventure or promiscuity during youth
[Old English āte, of obscure origin]

oat


(ōt),
n.
1. a cereal grass, Avena sativa, cultivated for its edible grain.
2. Usu., oats. the grain of this plant.
3. any of several other plants of the genus Avena, as the wild oat.
4. Archaic. a musical pipe made of an oat straw.
Idioms:
feel one's oats,
a. to feel or show giddy animation.
b. to have a strong sense of one's own power.
[before 900; Middle English ote, Old English āte]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oat - annual grass of Europe and North Africaoat - annual grass of Europe and North Africa; grains used as food and fodder (referred to primarily in the plural: `oats')
Avena sativa, cereal oat - widely cultivated in temperate regions for its edible grains
Avena fatua, wild oat, wild oat grass - common in meadows and pastures
Avena barbata, slender wild oat - oat of southern Europe and southwestern Asia
animated oat, Avene sterilis, wild red oat - Mediterranean oat held to be progenitor of modern cultivated oat
cereal, cereal grass - grass whose starchy grains are used as food: wheat; rice; rye; oats; maize; buckwheat; millet
2.oat - seed of the annual grass Avena sativa (spoken of primarily in the plural as `oats')
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
food grain, grain, cereal - foodstuff prepared from the starchy grains of cereal grasses
Avena sativa, cereal oat - widely cultivated in temperate regions for its edible grains
Translations
oves
havre
aveno
kaer
kaura
zob
zab
oves
havre

oat

n usu plHafer m; oats pl (Cook) → Haferflocken pl; to sow one’s wild oats (fig)sich (dat)die Hörner abstoßen; he’s feeling his oatsihn sticht der Hafer; to be off one’s oats (hum inf)keinen Appetit haben; he hasn’t had his oats for some time (hum inf)der hat schon lange keine mehr vernascht (hum sl)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sweep and Shred Formula is composed of Pu'er tea extract which eliminates fats that are hard to digest, aloe vera powder that detoxifies and cleanses the colon, alfalfa that nourishes the digestive system and oat fiber that controls the appetite.
OatWell[R] brand oat beta-glucan is a recent addition to DSM's health ingredient portfolio, following the acquisition of the OatWell[R] brand from Swedish Oat Fiber earlier this year.
In addition, it produces a range of other oat-based ingredients including PrOATein (oat protein), oat dextrin and insoluble oat fiber.
Strides to up the intake of whole grains and other fiber-rich ingredients, including oat fiber, corn bran, inulin or chicory root fiber, and soluble corn fiber, are being made.
Oat fiber has garnered the interest of food producers and nutritionists.
Oat fiber is of interest to foodmakers and nutritionists alike.
Studies show that just 3 grams of soluble oat fiber per day--the amount found in one bowl of oatmeal--lowers total cholesterol by 8 to 23 percent in individuals with elevated levels.
based DSM Nutritional, last month expanded its ingredient portfolio with the acquisition of the OatWell brand of beta glucan from Swedish Oat Fiber (SOF).
Most "double fiber" breads--and most "lights" and many regulars--add highly processed fibers like inulin (chicory root), wheat fiber, cellulose fiber, polydextrose, soy fiber, modified wheat starch, and oat fiber.
Researchers working in food science, nutrition, gastroenterology, the food industry, and other areas in the US, Europe, Australia, and Asia address regulations for food labeling; fiber ingredients in foods, such as resistant starch and maltodextrin, rice bran fiber, oat fiber, sugarcane fiber, wheat bran, pectin, fruit fibers, fig fruit by-products, tiger nut fiber, pomegranate peel extract, brown rice, and acacia gum; measurement techniques for insulin sensitivity; and colonic metabolism.
Although delicious and nutritious oat breads, muffins, cookies, and a number of other products abound, it is still as oatmeal that most Americans enjoy their daily fix of oat fiber.
Within sections on soluble fibers, resistant starch, conventional fibers, and new development, the studies examine such ingredients as inulin, pectin, oat fiber from oat hulls, sugar beet fiber, psyllium, and the novel wheat ingredient aleurone flour.