obediential

obediential

(əˌbiːdɪˈɛnʃəl)
adj
an archaic word for obedient
References in periodicals archive ?
In The Second Nun's Prologue and Tale, Chaucer associates the overthrow of tyranny and the grounding of hope with Marian-incarnational revelatory presence and self-sacrificial, obediential responsiveness.
39) This part of the volume will also contain a thorough presentation of Lonergan's position on the natural desire to see God and on nature as obediential potency for the satisfaction of that desire, (40) and it will relate that position to other contemporary positions on what has become once again a very vibrant theological topic.
I hope that in my reading and feedback via editorial note I can also contribute somewhat as an outsider to all the contributors' conversations, hoping for the spirit of what may be regarded, borrowing from Dussel, as obediential scholarship (I am not particularly fond of the notion of anyone obeying anything or anyone, though I see the point Dussel is making in critiquing top-to-bottom leadership models).
In operation is a schematic interlocking of law and grace, a dialectic that required penitential and obediential undertakings here, passive and receptive postures there.
Its universal applicability is directed by empathic emotions, while its particularity is defined in obediential dispositions.
But that very response, which issues out of an obediential hearing, can be misread as carping negativity, a distancing of oneself from the Holy See.
Lottin and Haring developed a theology of conscience because they believed that Catholicism had created an obediential, minimalist passivity in the laity that left them unprepared for the Nazis and allied Fascists.
On the other hand, no, because for Balthasar faith is an existential and obediential stance, not primarily a category of religious knowing.
the fact of perfect vision alone proves its possibility, and it is known only by revelation) (42) Moreover, the passive potency for such vision is remote and obediential, meaning that there is a disproportion between the created intellect and the infinite being; thus only the latter can bring about the actualization of such potency.
This capacity for the infinite is also what Rahner calls an obediential potency, as a potency for God that God is not under obligation to fulfill, but rather gratuitously fills through grace (and ultimately glory), and which can only be "obediently accepted" by the human person.
36 Haring sees the manualists as being responsible for this conforming, obediential moral theology, one that is worried solely about following church rules; instead, he summons conscientious Christians to a responsive and responsible life of discipleship.
s narrative, de Lubac made a religiously heroic but philosophically confused effort to combat reductive secular naturalism; his flawed exegesis of Aquinas conflates the natural desire for rationally knowing God with the supernatural desire--divinely elicited from human nature's "specific obediential potency"--for seeing God.