obligation

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Related to Obligations: Contractual obligations

ob·li·ga·tion

 (ŏb′lĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1.
a. A social, legal, or moral requirement, such as a duty, contract, or promise, that compels one to follow or avoid a particular course of action: Are you able to meet your obligations? I have an obligation to attend their wedding.
b. The constraining power of a promise, contract, law, or sense of duty: I felt no obligation to offer my advice.
c. Law A document in which a person binds himself or herself to undertake or refrain from doing a particular act.
d. A debt instrument, such as a loan, mortgage, or bond.
2. The state, fact, or feeling of being indebted to another for a special service or favor received: If they invite us, aren't we under obligation to invite them in return?

ob′li·ga′tion·al adj.

obligation

(ˌɒblɪˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. a moral or legal requirement; duty
2. the act of obligating or the state of being obligated
3. (Law) law a legally enforceable agreement to perform some act, esp to pay money, for the benefit of another party
4. (Law) law
a. a written contract containing a penalty
b. an instrument acknowledging indebtedness to secure the repayment of money borrowed
5. a person or thing to which one is bound morally or legally
6. something owed in return for a service or favour
7. a service or favour for which one is indebted
ˌobliˈgational adj

ob•li•ga•tion

(ˌɒb lɪˈgeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. something by which a person is bound to do certain things, and which arises out of a sense of duty or results from custom, law, etc.
2. something done or to be done for such reasons: to fulfill one's obligations.
3. a binding promise, contract, sense of duty, etc.
4. the act of obligating oneself, as by a promise or contract.
5.
a. an agreement enforceable by law.
b. a document setting forth such an agreement.
6. any bond, certificate, or the like, as of a government or a corporation, serving as evidence of indebtedness.
7. an indebtedness or amount of indebtedness.
8. a debt of gratitude.
9. the state of being under a debt.
[1250–1300; Middle English (< Old French) < Latin]
syn: See duty.

obligation

  • obstriction - An obligation.
  • convert into, convert to - Convert into means to change from one thing to another; convert to means to switch allegiance, loyalty, or obligation.
  • delinquent - Literally "completely having left" one's duty or obligation.
  • likely, liable - Use likely if you mean "probable, expected"; use liable if you mean "bound by law or obligation."

obligation

duty
1. 'obligation' and 'duty'

If you say that someone has an obligation to do something or a duty to do something, you mean that they ought to do it, because it is their responsibility. When obligation and duty are used like this, they have the same meaning.

When teachers assign homework, students usually feel an obligation to do it.
Perhaps it was his duty to tell the police what he had seen.
2. 'duties'

Your duties are the things that you do as part of your job.

She has been given a reasonable time to learn her duties.
They also have to carry out many administrative duties.

Be Careful!
Don't refer to the things that you do as part of your job as 'obligations'.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obligation - the social force that binds you to the courses of action demanded by that forceobligation - the social force that binds you to the courses of action demanded by that force; "we must instill a sense of duty in our children"; "every right implies a responsibility; every opportunity, an obligation; every possession, a duty"- John D.Rockefeller Jr
job - the responsibility to do something; "it is their job to print the truth"
safekeeping, guardianship, keeping - the responsibility of a guardian or keeper; "he left his car in my keeping"
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
moral obligation - an obligation arising out of considerations of right and wrong; "he did it out of a feeling of moral obligation"
noblesse oblige - the obligation of those of high rank to be honorable and generous (often used ironically)
burden of proof - the duty of proving a disputed charge
civic duty, civic responsibility - the responsibilities of a citizen
filial duty - duty of a child to its parents
imperative - some duty that is essential and urgent
incumbency - a duty that is incumbent upon you
legal duty - acts which the law requires be done or forborne
line of duty - all that is normally required in some area of responsibility
white man's burden - the supposed responsibility of the white race to provide care for their non-white subjects
prerequisite, requirement - something that is required in advance; "Latin was a prerequisite for admission"
requirement, demand - required activity; "the requirements of his work affected his health"; "there were many demands on his time"
2.obligation - the state of being obligated to do or pay something; "he is under an obligation to finish the job"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
financial obligation, indebtedness, liability - an obligation to pay money to another party
3.obligation - a personal relation in which one is indebted for a service or favor
personal relation, personal relationship - a relation between persons
4.obligation - a written promise to repay a debt
cash equivalent - a highly liquid debt instrument with maturities of less than three months
certificate of deposit, CD - a debt instrument issued by a bank; usually pays interest
note of hand, promissory note, note - a promise to pay a specified amount on demand or at a certain time; "I had to co-sign his note at the bank"
document - a written account of ownership or obligation
floater - a debt instrument with a variable interest rate tied to some other interest rate (e.g. the rate paid by T-bills)
bond certificate, bond - a certificate of debt (usually interest-bearing or discounted) that is issued by a government or corporation in order to raise money; the issuer is required to pay a fixed sum annually until maturity and then a fixed sum to repay the principal
5.obligation - a legal agreement specifying a payment or action and the penalty for failure to comply
written agreement - a legal document summarizing the agreement between parties
debt - an obligation to pay or do something

obligation

noun
1. duty, pressure, compulsion Students usually feel an obligation to attend lectures.
2. task, job, duty, work, calling, business, charge, role, function, mission, province, assignment, pigeon (informal), chore I feel that's my obligation, to do whatever is possible.
3. responsibility, duty, liability, accountability, culpability, answerability, accountableness I have an ethical and moral obligation to my client.
4. contract, promise, agreement, understanding, bond, debt, commitment, engagement The companies failed to meet their obligation to plant new trees.
under an obligation in (someone's) debt, indebted, obliged, grateful, thankful, obligated, beholden, duty-bound, honour-bound, owing a favour I'd rather not be under any obligation to him.
without obligation free, for free (informal), for nothing, unpaid, complimentary, free of charge, on the house, without charge, gratuitous, gratis, buckshee (Brit. slang) Our advice and quotations are without obligation.

obligation

noun
1. An act or course of action that is demanded of one, as by position, custom, law, or religion:
2. Something, such as money, owed by one person to another:
3. A condition of owing something to another:
Translations
إلْتِزام
závazek
forpligtelse
velvollisuus
kötelességkötelezettséglekötelezettség
skuldbinding, skylda, kvöî
moratiobveznost
görevyükümlülük

obligation

[ˌɒblɪˈgeɪʃən] Nobligación f
without obligation (in advert) → sin compromiso
"no obligation to buy"sin compromiso a comprar
it is your obligation to see thatle cumple a usted comprobar que + subjun
to be under an obligation to sb/to do sthestar comprometido con algn/a hacer algo
to lay or put sb under an obligationponer a algn bajo una obligación
to meet/fail to meet one's obligationshacer frente a/faltar a sus compromisos
of obligation (Rel) → de precepto

obligation

[ˌɒblɪˈgeɪʃən] n
(= duty) → obligation f
to have an obligation to sb [+ parent, person in need] → avoir une obligation envers qn
His daughter didn't seem to feel much of an obligation to him → Sa fille ne semblait pas ressentir beaucoup d'obligations envers lui.
to have a contractual obligation to sb → avoir une obligation contractuelle envers qn
an obligation to do sth → l'obligation de faire qch
There is no legal obligation to state it on the label → Il n'y a pas d'obligation légale de le mentionner sur l'étiquette.
to have an obligation to do sth → avoir l'obligation de faire qch
to be under an obligation to do sth → être dans l'obligation de faire qch
to be under no obligation to do sth → n'être aucunement dans l'obligation de faire qch
We are under no obligation to give him what he wants → Nous ne sommes aucunement dans l'obligation de lui donner ce qu'il veut
There is no obligation on them to do this → Ils n'ont aucune obligation de faire cela.
(= debt) → obligation f
"without obligation" → "sans engagement"

obligation

nVerpflichtung f, → Pflicht f; to be under an obligation to do somethingverpflichtet sein or die Pflicht haben, etw zu tun; to be under no obligation to do somethingnicht verpflichtet sein, etw zu tun; to be under or have an obligation to somebodyjdm verpflichtet sein; you have placed us all under a great obligationwir sind Ihnen alle sehr verpflichtet; without obligation (Comm) → unverbindlich, ohne Obligo (form); with no obligation to buyohne Kaufzwang

obligation

[ˌɒblɪˈgeɪʃn] n (duty) → obbligo; (compulsion) → impegno
"without obligation" → "senza impegno"
to be under an obligation to sb/to do sth → essere in dovere verso qn/di fare qc
I'm under no obligation to do it → non sono tenuto a farlo
to meet one's obligations → rispettare i propri impegni
to fail to meet one's obligations → venire meno ai propri impegni

oblige

(əˈblaidʒ) verb
1. to force to do something. She was obliged to go; The police obliged him to leave.
2. to do (someone) a favour or service. Could you oblige me by carrying this, please?
obligation (obliˈgeiʃən) noun
a promise or duty. You are under no obligation to buy this.
obligatory (əˈbligətəri) , ((American) əbligəˈto:ri) adjective
compulsory. Attendance at tonight's meeting is obligatory.
oˈbligatorily adverb
oˈbliging adjective
willing to help other people. He'll help you – he's very obliging.
oˈbligingly adverb

obligation

n. obligación, deber, compromiso.
References in classic literature ?
Every step which she took toward relieving herself from obligations added to her strength and expansion as an individual.
For though the French commander bore a high character for courage and enterprise, he was also thought to be expert in those political practises which do not always respect the nicer obligations of morality, and which so generally disgraced the European diplomacy of that period.
Like all other ties, it brought along with it its obligations.
As Queequeg's Ramadan, or Fasting and Humiliation, was to continue all day, I did not choose to disturb him till towards night-fall; for I cherish the greatest respect towards everybody's religious obligations, never mind how comical, and could not find it in my heart to undervalue even a congregation of ants worshipping a toad-stool; or those other creatures in certain parts of our earth, who with a degree of footmanism quite unprecedented in other planets, bow down before the torso of a deceased landed proprietor merely on account of the inordinate possessions yet owned and rented in his name.
In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations and my obligations to Society.
Bessie answered not; but ere long, addressing me, she said--"You ought to be aware, Miss, that you are under obligations to Mrs.
A civil engineer in the north of England, who owed certain obligations to Mr.
Nothing has, as yet, turned up; and it may not surprise you, my dear Master Copperfield, so much as it would a stranger, to know that we are at present waiting for a remittance from London, to discharge our pecuniary obligations at this hotel.
With my head full of George Barnwell, I was at first disposed to believe that I must have had some hand in the attack upon my sister, or at all events that as her near relation, popularly known to be under obligations to her, I was a more legitimate object of suspicion than any one else.
The blood rose to her cheeks, as, courteously waving her hand, and bending so low that her beautiful and loose tresses were for an instant mixed with the flowing mane of her palfrey, she expressed in few but apt words her obligations and her gratitude to Locksley and her other deliverers.
Neither had I so soon learned the gratitude of courtiers, to persuade myself, that his majesty's present seventies acquitted me of all past obligations.
Then, in 1900, the Post Office tossed aside all obligations to the licensed company, and threw open the door to a free-for-all competition.