oblivion

(redirected from Oblivions)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

o·bliv·i·on

 (ə-blĭv′ē-ən)
n.
1. The condition or quality of being completely forgotten: "He knows that everything he writes is consigned to posterity (oblivion's other, seemingly more benign, face)" (Joyce Carol Oates).
2. The act or an instance of forgetting; total forgetfulness: sought the great oblivion of sleep.
3. Archaic Official overlooking of offenses; amnesty.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin oblīviō, oblīviōn-, from oblīvīscī, to forget; see lei- in Indo-European roots.]

oblivion

(əˈblɪvɪən)
n
1. the condition of being forgotten or disregarded
2. the state of being mentally withdrawn or blank
3. (Law) law an intentional overlooking, esp of political offences; amnesty; pardon
[C14: via Old French from Latin oblīviō forgetfulness, from oblīviscī to forget]

ob•liv•i•on

(əˈblɪv i ən)

n.
1. the state of being completely forgotten.
2. the state of forgetting or of being oblivious: the oblivion of sleep.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin oblīviō=oblīv(īscī) to forget + -iō -ion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oblivion - the state of being disregarded or forgotten
obscurity - an obscure and unimportant standing; not well known; "he worked in obscurity for many years"
2.oblivion - total forgetfulness; "he sought the great oblivion of sleep"
forgetfulness - unawareness caused by neglectful or heedless failure to remember; "his forgetfulness increased as he grew older"

oblivion

noun
1. unconsciousness, forgetfulness, senselessness, obliviousness, unawareness, insensibility, (waters of) Lethe He drank himself into oblivion.
unconsciousness perception, awareness, consciousness, sensibility
2. neglect, anonymity, insignificance, obscurity, limbo, nothingness, unimportance Most of these performers will fail and sink into oblivion.
3. extinction, annihilation, eradication, obliteration An entire section of the town was bombed into oblivion.

oblivion

noun
Freedom from worry, care, or unpleasantness:
Translations
oubliscotomisation

oblivion

[əˈblɪvɪən] Nolvido m
to cast into oblivionechar al olvido
to fall or sink into oblivioncaer en el olvido

oblivion

[əˈblɪviən] noubli m
to be consigned to oblivion (= forgotten about) → être relégué au passé, être relégué aux oubliettes
to consign sb to oblivion → condamner qn à l'oubli
to consign sth to oblivion → reléguer qch aux oubliettes

oblivion

n
Vergessenheit f, → Vergessen nt; to sink or fall into oblivionin Vergessenheit geraten, der Vergessenheit anheimfallen (geh); to rescue somebody/something from oblivionjdn/etw wieder ins Bewusstsein or ans Tageslicht bringen; he drank himself into oblivioner trank bis zur Bewusstlosigkeit; to be bombed/blasted into oblivion (town etc) → dem Erdboden gleichgemacht werden
(= unawareness) = obliviousness

oblivion

[əˈblɪvɪən] noblio
to fall or sink into oblivion → cadere nell'oblio
References in classic literature ?
Therefore, he made them all drink of the Water of Oblivion and forget everything they had known, so that they became as simple and innocent as their King.
But in the other two destructions, by deluge and earthquake, it is further to be noted, that the remnant of people which hap to be reserved, are commonly ignorant and mountainous people, that can give no account of the time past; so that the oblivion is all one, as if none had been left.
Many Theresas have been born who found for themselves no epic life wherein there was a constant unfolding of far-resonant action; perhaps only a life of mistakes, the offspring of a certain spiritual grandeur ill-matched with the meanness of opportunity; perhaps a tragic failure which found no sacred poet and sank unwept into oblivion.
As the supreme perfection and universality of the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey" cast into oblivion whatever pre-Homeric poets had essayed, so these same qualities exercised a paralysing influence over the successors of Homer.