obstruent

(redirected from Obstruent consonant)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

ob·stru·ent

 (ŏb′stro͞o-ənt)
adj.
Obstructing or closing natural openings or passages of the body.
n.
1. An obstruent medicine or agent.
2. Linguistics A sound, such as a stop, fricative, or affricate, that is produced with complete blockage or at least partial constriction of the airflow through the nose or mouth.

[Latin obstruēns, obstruent-, present participle of obstruere, to obstruct; see obstruct.]

obstruent

(ˈɒbstrʊənt) med
adj
(Medicine) causing obstruction, esp of the intestinal tract
n
(Medicine) anything that causes obstruction
[C17: from Latin obstruere to obstruct]

ob•stru•ent

(ˈɒb stru ənt)

adj.
1. (of a speech sound) characterized by stoppage or obstruction of the flow of air from the lungs.
n.
2. an obstruent speech sound; a stop, fricative, or affricate. Compare resonant (def. 7).
[1660–70; < Latin obstruent-, s. of obstruēns, present participle of obstruere; see obstruct, -ent]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obstruent - a consonant that is produced with a partial or complete blockage of the airflow from the lungs through the nose or mouth
consonant - a speech sound that is not a vowel
occlusive, plosive, plosive consonant, plosive speech sound, stop consonant, stop - a consonant produced by stopping the flow of air at some point and suddenly releasing it; "his stop consonants are too aspirated"
continuant, continuant consonant - consonant articulated by constricting (but not closing) the vocal tract
affricate, affricate consonant, affricative - a composite speech sound consisting of a stop and a fricative articulated at the same point (as `ch' in `chair' and `j' in `joy')
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Cooper and Ross (1975) maintain that words in second position tend to begin with a more obstruent consonant. This claim is backed up experimentally by Pinker and Birdsong (1979), who manipulate initial obstruents in ten nonsense binomial pairs.
According to Miller and Nicely (1955), in the places of articulation of the obstruent consonants, the coronals show more auditory perceptual salience.