Occidentalism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Oc·ci·den·tal·ism

 (ŏk′sĭ-dĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A quality, mannerism, or custom specific to or characteristic of the Occident.
2. Scholarly knowledge of Occidental cultures, languages, and peoples.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Oc•ci•den•tal•ism

(ˌɒk sɪˈdɛn tlˌɪz əm)

n.
Occidental character or characteristics.
[1830–40]
Oc`ci•den′tal•ist, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Occidentalism

the characteristics and customs of people situated in western regions, especially the Western Hemisphere, as western European countries and the United States. — Occidentalist, n.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Occidentalism - the scholarly knowledge of western cultures and languages and people
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
2.occidentalism - the quality or customs or mannerisms characteristic of Western civilizations
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2004, the philosopher Avishai Margalit and Dutch author Ian Buruma published Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of its Enemies.
Throughout the conference, attendees examined several themes relating to Bennabi's work through various papers presented by leading scholars, including Parallel Structures of Civilizational and Scientific Processes; Religion and Faith in the Conditions of the Renaissance; Malek Bennabi's Ideas on Occidentalism; and Western Civilization in Malek Bennabi's Thought.
It gave us great pleasure to convene leading scholars to impart their knowledge of Malek Bennabi's insights on Islamic thought, while building on them to develop a contemporary framework for a renewed renaissance or nahda." Throughout the conference, attendees examined several themes relating to Bennabi's work through various papers presented by leading scholars, including Parallel Structures of Civilisational and Scientific Processes; Religion and Faith in the Conditions of the Renaissance; Malek Bennabi's Ideas on Occidentalism; and Western Civilisation in Malek Bennabi's Thought.
Chapter 1 focuses on a conceptual framework, which emphasizes how policy, market, technology, and culture mutually influence the dialectic relations between nationalism and cosmopolitanism, Orientalism and Occidentalism, state and media, technology and ideology, and advertisers and Chinese consumers.
The accusation that Mo Yan distorted the Chinese image follows from a forced transplantation of western postcolonial critical theory, simplistically interpreting his creative, critical narratives as an expression of his desire to cater to a certain Occidentalism. Objectively, it has ignored social and cultural conflicts in the local context; subjectively, it emphasizes on an imagined oppression of discourse imposed on China by the westerners; taken together, it only exposes its practitioners' conscious or unconscious conformation to the dominant ideology.
On the one hand, Wong vigorously denounces British colonial authorities in Malaya, revealing his unyielding longing for de-colonization, as evidenced in the poems quoted above; on the other hand, Wong sometimes commits acts of "Occidentalism" in relation to the colonizer.
Mughal Occidentalism: Artistic Encounters Between Europe and Asia at the Courts of India, 1580-1630
Such blanket dismissals that the 'West' does not understand Afghanistan (as if knowledge on Afghanistan is a non-Western preserve), or that independent scholars working in Western universities are condemned to a monolithic viewpoint by default, underscores the review's curious Occidentalism.
It was not clear that Latour had done sufficient homework to avoid the projections of Western orientalism or to parry Chinese occidentalism. Latour had trouble making clear what he wanted from China, but he seemed to be asking Chinese intellectuals to contribute to his own project of "re-describing" the world (to better investigate the connections between nature and society), without appreciating the deeper distinctiveness of traditional Chinese culture or the ways contemporary Chinese often want to imitate the West.
"Houellebecq's Occidentalism," Australian Humanities Review 62(November): 65-78.
Gulumbe, "Evaluation of in vitro antimicrobial activities and phytochemical constituents of Cassia occidentalism in Proceedings of the Animal Reserarch International, vol.
To begin, the introduction considers Latin America's place in post-colonial studies and introduces key topics such as "Occidentalism / Post-Occidentalism," "Orientalism / Post-Orientalism" and the "Locus of Enunciation." Fiddian explains that he will use these theories and apply them to the work of Borges in the remainder of the book to create the "postcolonial profile" of his subject.