occidental

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oc·ci·den·tal

or Oc·ci·den·tal  (ŏk′sĭ-dĕn′tl)
adj.
Of or relating to the countries of the Occident or their peoples or cultures; western.
n.
A native or inhabitant of an Occidental country; a westerner.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

occidental

(ˌɒksɪˈdɛntəl)
adj
a literary or formal word for western Compare oriental

Occidental

(ˌɒksɪˈdɛntəl)
adj
of or relating to the Occident
n
(Physical Geography) an inhabitant, esp a native, of the Occident
ˌOcciˈdentalism n
ˌOcciˈdentalist n, adj
ˌOcciˈdentally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

oc•ci•den•tal

(ˌɒk sɪˈdɛn tl)

adj.
1. (usu. cap.) of or pertaining to the Occident or its inhabitants.
2. western.
n.
3. (usu. cap.) an inhabitant of the Occident.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
oc`ci•den′tal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Occidental - a native inhabitant of the Occident
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
2.Occidental - an artificial language
artificial language - a language that is deliberately created for a specific purpose
Adj.1.occidental - denoting or characteristic of countries of Europe and the western hemisphere; "occidental civilization"; "Hesperian culture"
western - relating to or characteristic of the western parts of the world or the West as opposed to the eastern or oriental parts; "the Western world"; "Western thought"; "Western thought"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

occidental

[ˌɒksɪˈdentl] ADJoccidental
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

occidental

[ˌɒksɪˈdɛntəl] adj (= western) → occidental(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

occidental

adj (liter)abendländisch
n (rare)Abendländer(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

occidental

[ˌɒksɪˈdɛntl] adj (frm) → occidentale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Of firmly dividing the world along the mythical, and European-devised, Orientalist and Occidentalist boundary.
It is Hoja, the Easterner who is in fact the Westerner to Occidentalist tenets.
At several points, Rappa uses the term "Occidentalist" to refer to Western scholars using a stereotyped image of Asia.
His occidentalist gaze of photography is well perceived for its exhibition of its own land which is "exceptional, mixing distance with intutive intensity" (Rai 2008:4).
Yet a growing body of criticism has found cosmopolitan writing that resists Occidentalist or Capitalist domination.
The terms "Orientalist" and "Occidentalist" are used interchangeably, as both denote Global Northerners writing about the "Orient."
(1) Prominent research into Chinese Occidentalist construction of the modern West has set its domain in the second half of the nineteenth century and later, exploring China's portrayal of the West as a target for attack or a mirror for self- reflection, though the instinct to "other" Westerners was present with the Chinese at the initial moments of wonder, fear, and hatred in real and imaginary contacts with the West as early as the Ming dynasty.
This last is particularly focused on those coming from the Near and Middle East who sometimes simply counter scholars with critically weak occidentalist views.
Her focus is on the orientalist and occidentalist themes at play within Conrad's fiction and how this has shaped the literary landscape of the region.
The shape of his discourse was clearly "occidentalist." He was using distorted, timeless and highly negative images of the West, as a means to criticize Yemeni society itself.
However, I do not want to draw a strong comparison between these two incidents, for assuming they are equal makes the same occidentalist assumptions (that suicide bombers are crazy or brainwashed) that Brunner critiques.