apophasis

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Related to Occultatio: apophasis, Praeteritio, Cataphasis

a·poph·a·sis

 (ə-pŏf′ə-sĭs)
n.
Allusion to something by denying that it will be mentioned, as in I will not bring up my opponent's questionable financial dealings.

[Late Latin, from Greek, from apophanai, to say no : apo-, apo- + phanai, to say; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apophasis

(əˈpɒfəsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the device of mentioning a subject by stating that it will not be mentioned: I shall not discuss his cowardice or his treachery.
[C17: via Latin from Greek: denial, from apo- + phanai to say]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

apophasis

- Mentioning a subject by saying one is not going to mention it.
See also related terms for mention.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

apophasis

a spoken or written figure in which an assertion is made in the midst of a denial, as in Mark Antony’s funeral speech for Caesar. Also called paralipsis. — apophasic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

apophasis

The deliberate mentioning of a subject by saying that it will not be mentioned.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apophasis - mentioning something by saying it will not be mentioned
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Occultatio: The Bush Administration's Rhetorical War." Western Journal of Communication 74.4 (2010): 329-350.
The Hebrew scriptures were preserved as part of the Christian canon chiefly by allegorizing them as "the Old Testament." Augustine's famous formulation laid the ground for medieval Christian readings of the Hebrew scriptures: In Veteri Testamento est occultatio Novi, in Novo Testamento est manifestatio Veteris |"In the Old Testament there is a concealment of the New, in the New Testament there is a revelation of the Old"~.(53) As J.