occult

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oc·cult

 (ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or dealing with supernatural or magical influences, agencies, or occurrences: occult astrological powers.
2. Available only to the initiate; secret or mysterious: occult lore. See Synonyms at mysterious.
3. Beyond the realm of human comprehension; inscrutable: The causes of those phenomena remain occult.
4. Hidden from view; concealed: "Hatchlings and juveniles ... keep to this occult place through all the seasons" (David M. Carroll).
5.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
n.
Occult practices or techniques: a student of the occult.
v. (ə-kŭlt′) oc·cult·ed, oc·cult·ing, oc·cults
v.tr.
1. To conceal or cause to disappear from view.
2. Astronomy To conceal by occultation: The moon occulted Mars.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

[Latin occultus, secret, past participle of occulere, to cover over; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

adj
1.
a. of or characteristic of magical, mystical, or supernatural arts, phenomena, or influences
b. (as noun): the occult.
2. beyond ordinary human understanding
3. secret or esoteric
vb
4. (Astronomy) astronomy (of a celestial body) to hide (another celestial body) from view by occultation or (of a celestial body) to become hidden by occultation
5. to hide or become hidden or shut off from view
6. (intr) (of lights, esp in lighthouses) to shut off at regular intervals
[C16: from Latin occultus, past participle of occulere, from ob- over, up + -culere, related to celāre to conceal]
ocˈcultly adv
ocˈcultness n

oc•cult

(əˈkʌlt, ˈɒk ʌlt)
adj.
1. of or pertaining to any system claiming use or knowledge of secret or supernatural powers or agencies.
2. beyond ordinary knowledge or understanding.
3. secret; disclosed or communicated only to the initiated.
4. hidden from view.
5. Med. not readily detectable, esp. at the place of origin: occult bleeding.
n.
6. the occult, the supernatural, or supernatural agencies and affairs considered as a whole.
v.t.
7. to block or shut off (an object) from view; hide.
8. to hide (a celestial body) by occultation.
v.i.
9. to become hidden or shut off from view.
[1520–30; < Latin occultus, past participle of occulere to hide from view =oc- oc- + -culere, akin to cēlāre to conceal]
oc•cult′ly, adv.
oc•cult′ness, n.

occult


Past participle: occulted
Gerund: occulting

Imperative
occult
occult
Present
I occult
you occult
he/she/it occults
we occult
you occult
they occult
Preterite
I occulted
you occulted
he/she/it occulted
we occulted
you occulted
they occulted
Present Continuous
I am occulting
you are occulting
he/she/it is occulting
we are occulting
you are occulting
they are occulting
Present Perfect
I have occulted
you have occulted
he/she/it has occulted
we have occulted
you have occulted
they have occulted
Past Continuous
I was occulting
you were occulting
he/she/it was occulting
we were occulting
you were occulting
they were occulting
Past Perfect
I had occulted
you had occulted
he/she/it had occulted
we had occulted
you had occulted
they had occulted
Future
I will occult
you will occult
he/she/it will occult
we will occult
you will occult
they will occult
Future Perfect
I will have occulted
you will have occulted
he/she/it will have occulted
we will have occulted
you will have occulted
they will have occulted
Future Continuous
I will be occulting
you will be occulting
he/she/it will be occulting
we will be occulting
you will be occulting
they will be occulting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been occulting
you have been occulting
he/she/it has been occulting
we have been occulting
you have been occulting
they have been occulting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been occulting
you will have been occulting
he/she/it will have been occulting
we will have been occulting
you will have been occulting
they will have been occulting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been occulting
you had been occulting
he/she/it had been occulting
we had been occulting
you had been occulting
they had been occulting
Conditional
I would occult
you would occult
he/she/it would occult
we would occult
you would occult
they would occult
Past Conditional
I would have occulted
you would have occulted
he/she/it would have occulted
we would have occulted
you would have occulted
they would have occulted

occult

1. Magical or hidden. Supernatural or mystical happenings or acts which do not form part of a recognized religion. Witchcraft, divination, magic, Satanism are all considered to be part of the occult.
2. The occult is the realm of magic and the supernatural, or any knowledge or practices involved in this.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.occult - supernatural forces and events and beings collectivelyoccult - supernatural forces and events and beings collectively; "She doesn't believe in the supernatural"
causal agency, causal agent, cause - any entity that produces an effect or is responsible for events or results
spiritual being, supernatural being - an incorporeal being believed to have powers to affect the course of human events
theurgy - the effect of supernatural or divine intervention in human affairs
destiny, fate - the ultimate agency regarded as predetermining the course of events (often personified as a woman); "we are helpless in the face of destiny"
2.occult - supernatural practices and techniques; "he is a student of the occult"
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Verb1.occult - cause an eclipse of (a celestial body) by intervention; "The Sun eclipses the moon today"; "Planets and stars often are occulted by other celestial bodies"
overshadow - cast a shadow upon; "The tall tree overshadowed the house"
2.occult - become concealed or hidden from view or have its light extinguished; "The beam of light occults every so often"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
3.occult - hide from view; "The lids were occulting her eyes"
conceal, hold in, hold back - hold back; keep from being perceived by others; "She conceals her anger well"
Adj.1.occult - hidden and difficult to see; "an occult fracture"; "occult blood in the stool"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
2.occult - having an import not apparent to the senses nor obvious to the intelligence; beyond ordinary understanding; "mysterious symbols"; "the mystical style of Blake"; "occult lore"; "the secret learning of the ancients"
esoteric - confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories"

occult

noun
1. magic, witchcraft, sorcery, wizardry, enchantment, occultism, black art, necromancy, theurgy his unhealthy fascination with the occult
adjective
1. supernatural, dark, magical, mysterious, psychic, mystical, mystic, unearthly, unnatural, esoteric, uncanny, arcane, paranormal, abstruse, recondite, preternatural, cabbalistic, supranatural organizations which campaign against paganism and occult practices

occult

adjective
Difficult to explain or understand:
verb
To put or keep out of sight:
Slang: plant, stash.
Translations
okkultisme
السِّحْر والتَّنْجيمتنجيمية
окултизъм
ocultocultisme
det okkulteokkultisme
okultismo
okultism
piileväpimentääsalainensalattuyliluonnollinen
אוקולטיזם
okultizam
okkult
okultisme
yfirskilvitlegur; dulspeki
オカルト超自然現象
오컬트
okultizmas
okultisms
latentoccultocculteoccultismeverborgen
okultizmus
окултизам
ockultockultism
สิ่งลึกลับ
büyücülükgizem bilimiokültizm

occult

[ɒˈkʌlt]
A. ADJ (= mystic) → oculto; [reason etc] → oculto, misterioso
B. N the occultlo oculto
to study the occultdedicarse al ocultismo, estudiar las ciencias ocultas

occult

[ˈɒkʌlt ɒˈkʌlt]
adjocculte
n
the occult → l'occulte

occult

adjokkult; (= of occultism)okkultistisch; (= secret)geheimnisvoll
nOkkulte(s) nt

occult

[ɒˈkʌlt]
1. adjocculto/a
2. n the occultl'occulto

occult

(əˈkalt) : the occult
supernatural practices, ceremonies etc. He has made a study of witches, magic and the occult.

oc·cult

a. oculto-a, desconocido-a; escondido-a.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lot 2: blinds, occultations, net curtains and shutters.
However, Ruprecht says that researchers will have to observe more stellar occultations of Chiron to truly determine which interpretation -- rings, shell, or jets -- is the correct one.
Occultations of stars brighter than 4th magnitude that are visible from southern Africa are listed in Table 3.
These observations, called solar occultations, effectively allowed the scientists to observe Titan as a transiting exoplanet without having to leave the solar system.
Since astronomers haven't observed many centaur occultations and have already found a ring, Jewitt says, it may be that rings are relatively common.
A description of how to observe and report asteroidal occultations can be found in the 2014 Handbook, page 47.
Among specific topics are Keplerian orbits and dynamics of exoplanets, transits and occultations, tidal evolution of exoplanets, giant planet formation, and terrestrial planet atmospheres and biosignatures.
Total lunar occultations were observed for a number of years and reported to the Royal Observatory, Greenwich.
The Star-Diary is a calendar and diary for the next 100 years including eclipses, occultations, comets and near-Earth objects.
From John Gillies's exemplary "archeological" reading of the occultations structuring the early modern discourse of empire in "The Figure of the New World in The Tempest" to Peter Hulme's "close" reading of the surprisingly neglected response to The Tempest elaborated by anglophone (though not English) Caribbean intellectuals in "Reading from Elsewhere: George Lamming and the Paradox of Exile," this section underlines the fundamental assertion of the collection that the trans-Atlantic treatment of The Tempest has exhausted neither its textual base nor its theoretical purchase.
The duration of these occultations rarely exceeds 30 seconds.
The PlanetiQ radio occultation sensor will receive signals from all four major Global Navigation Satellite Systems--GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and Beidou--allowing the constellation to collect over 30,000 occultations per day.