apophasis

(redirected from Occupatio)
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a·poph·a·sis

 (ə-pŏf′ə-sĭs)
n.
Allusion to something by denying that it will be mentioned, as in I will not bring up my opponent's questionable financial dealings.

[Late Latin, from Greek, from apophanai, to say no : apo-, apo- + phanai, to say; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apophasis

(əˈpɒfəsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the device of mentioning a subject by stating that it will not be mentioned: I shall not discuss his cowardice or his treachery.
[C17: via Latin from Greek: denial, from apo- + phanai to say]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

apophasis

- Mentioning a subject by saying one is not going to mention it.
See also related terms for mention.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

apophasis

a spoken or written figure in which an assertion is made in the midst of a denial, as in Mark Antony’s funeral speech for Caesar. Also called paralipsis. — apophasic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

apophasis

The deliberate mentioning of a subject by saying that it will not be mentioned.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apophasis - mentioning something by saying it will not be mentioned
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These are all terms that signal moments of accommodation, and do so through the rhetorical figures of apophasis or occupatio, (16) through which stating that one will not mention something achieves the same effect as actually mentioning it.
Brooke Hunter has described these lines as generically what they are--a superb example of occupatio, a rhetorical move designed to introduce a subject by denying it--but also as what they are not: a fully fleshed out description of the war in and conquest over Femeny, the land of the Amazons.
Scholars have therefore theorised around grassroots movements and the fight for decent housing, autonomist movements, resistance against urban 'renewal' and displacements and around the spatialities of 'occupatio' (Corsin Jimenez and Estalella, 2013; Mayer, 2009; SqEK, 2013; van der Steen et al., 2014; Vasudevan, 2015a).
But also notable in this passage is a figure that could be regarded as the structural inverse of anaphora: occupatio. If anaphora, aided by asyndeton, suggests the endlessly ongoing potential of any list, occupatio, as in the final line of this quotation, appears to shut it down, providing the antidote to the list Yet even occupatio can be turned in the other direction and used to generate a list.
(26) Also, the support that national authorities will accept from the occupying authorities--both in the protection of cultural property in occupied territory and in other respects--will hinge largely on whether the occupation is in the nature of occupatio pacifica or occupatio bellica.
The technique of occupatio or seemingly discounting an idea, in this case, Dino's homosexual practices, in fact emphasizes that very idea.
Yet her use of the rhetorical figure of occupatio indicates that she wants Leontes to remember his sins and her conviction that she should assume this role.