hypertension

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Related to Ocular hypertension: glaucoma, ocular migraine

hy·per·ten·sion

 (hī′pər-tĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. Abnormally elevated arterial blood pressure.
b. Arterial disease marked by chronic high blood pressure.
2. Elevated pressure or tension of a body fluid, as of the intraocular or cerebrospinal fluids.

hypertension

(ˌhaɪpəˈtɛnʃən)
n
(Pathology) pathol abnormally high blood pressure
hypertensive adj, n

hy•per•ten•sion

(ˌhaɪ pərˈtɛn ʃən)

n.
1.
a. elevation of the blood pressure, esp. the diastolic pressure.
b. an arterial disease characterized by this condition.
2. excessive nervous tension.
[1890–95]

hy·per·ten·sion

(hī′pər-tĕn′shən)

hypertension

High blood pressure, often caused by stress, arteriosclerosis, or heart disease.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypertension - a common disorder in which blood pressure remains abnormally high (a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or greater)hypertension - a common disorder in which blood pressure remains abnormally high (a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or greater)
cardiovascular disease - a disease of the heart or blood vessels
essential hypertension, hyperpiesia, hyperpiesis - persistent and pathological high blood pressure for which no specific cause can be found
malignant hypertension - severe hypertension that runs a rapid course and damages the inner linings of the blood vessels and the heart and spleen and kidneys and brain; "malignant hypertension is the most lethal form of hypertension"
secondary hypertension - hypertension that is secondary to another disease
white-coat hypertension - temporary rise in blood pressure in the doctor's office
hypotension - abnormally low blood pressure
Translations
hypertenze

hypertension

[ˈhaɪpəˈtenʃən] N (Med) → hipertensión f

hypertension

[ˌhaɪpərˈtɛnʃən] nhypertension f

hypertension

[ˌhaɪpəˈtɛnʃn] n (Med) → ipertensione f

hy·per·ten·sion

n. hipertensión, presión arterial alta;
benign ______ benigna;
essential ______ esencial;
malignant ______ maligna;
portal ______ portal;
primary ______ primaria;
renal ______ renal.

hypertension

n hipertensión f, presión alta (de la sangre) (fam); benign intracranial — hipertensión intracraneal benigna; essential — hipertensión esencial; malignant — hipertensión maligna; portal — hipertensión portal; pulmonary — hipertensión pulmonar; renovascular — hipertensión renovascular; white-coat — hipertensión de bata blanca
References in periodicals archive ?
Glaucoma is a term describing a group of ocular disorders with multifactorial etiology united by a clinically characteristic intraocular pressure (IOP) associated optic neuropathy, [1] a definite causal relationship has been reported between the level of IOP and damage to the optic nerve with resultant change in visual field [2] Raised IOP is seen in a vast number of ocular conditions, but the two most common ocular diseases associated with increased IOP are glaucoma and ocular hypertension (OH).
5% given twice daily in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.
The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Ocular Hypertension
A Ocular hypertension is an increase in pressure inside your eyes, caused by a buildup of the fluid in the front of your eye.
Conclusion: It was concluded from this study that injectable suspension of betamethasone alone can induce ocular hypertension very effectively.
Key words: glaucoma, ocular hypertension, mannitol, dorzolamide, avian, western screech owl, Megascops kennicottii
and Canada for indications of glaucoma and ocular hypertension was made between Sucampo and us in April 2009.
PNT is the only non-invasive method of treatment capable of reducing intra-occular pressure in sufferers of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) - which accounts for 95% of diagnosed glaucoma cases in Europe, the Americas and Africa - as well as ocular hypertension.
TIMOPTIC (timolol maleate) is a non-selective beta- adrenergic receptor blocking agent indicated for the treatment of elevated intraocular pressure in patients with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma.
Prior to testing, subjects had complete eye exams, ocular hypertension and no signs of glaucoma.
A growing population of over 10 million people worldwide with vision-threatening complications of diabetes and over 50 million people with ocular hypertension require treatments with retinal laser photocoagulators.
Through collaboration, the two companies aim to develop an ophthalmic solution for treating glaucoma and ocular hypertension.