odd lot

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odd lot

n.
A quantity that differs from a standard trading unit, especially an amount of stock of fewer than 100 shares.

odd′-lot′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

odd lot

n
1. (Commerce) a batch of merchandise that contains less than or more than the usual number of units
2. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange a number of securities less than the standard trading unit of 100
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

odd′ lot′


n.
1. a quantity or amount less than the conventional unit of trading.
2. (in a stock transaction) a quantity of stock less than 100 shares.
[1895–1900]
odd′-lot′, adj
odd′-lot′ter, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Carey had so many books that he did not know them, and as he read little he forgot the odd lots he had bought at one time and another because they were cheap.
"You shall catch it for this, my gentleman, when you get home!" burst in female accents from the human heap--those of the unhappy partner of the man whose clumsiness had caused the mishap; she happened also to be his recently married wife, in which assortment there was nothing unusual at Trantridge as long as any affection remained between wedded couples; and, indeed, it was not uncustomary in their later lives, to avoid making odd lots of the single people between whom there might be a warm understanding.
GameStop expects to accept the shares on a pro rata basis, except for tenders of "odd lots," which will be accepted in full and conditional tenders that will automatically be regarded as withdrawn because the condition of the tender has not been met, and has been informed by the depositary that the preliminary proration factor for the tender offer is approximately 41.3%.
Because the aggregate purchase price for all shares properly tendered at or below the purchase price and not properly withdrawn before the expiration date would have exceeded $609 million, such shares were accepted for purchase on a pro rata basis, except for "odd lots," which were accepted in full.
Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the offer, the fund will buy shares from all tendering stockholders on a pro rata basis, after disregarding "odd lots" and fractions, based on the number of shares properly tendered (pro-ration factor).
The SEC states that the initial performance was attributable to buying smaller-sized bonds known as "odd lots" as part of a strategy to help bolster performance out of the gate.
In accordance with the terms and conditions of the tender offer, and based on the preliminary count by the tendering agent, FLY expects to repurchase approximately 5,376,344 Shares at USD13.95 per Share on a pro rata basis, except for tenders of odd lots, which will be accepted in full, for a total cost of approximately USD75,000,000, excluding fees and expenses related to the tender offer.
Because the number of shares tendered at or below the USD21.50 purchase price (or by shareholders electing to tender at the ultimate purchase price determined under the tender offer terms) exceeds the amount that NBHC offered to purchase, the resulting proration factor, after giving effect to the priority for odd lots, is approximately 91.32 percent.
The book offers reflections on Dan Graham's Two-Way Mirror Cylinder Inside Cube, Gordon Matta-Clark's Fake Estates and the Odd Lots exhibition, and Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's Relational Architecture.
The guide is split into six categories: field/crop, barn/shop, farmhouse, livestock, specialty tools and odd lots. It's a great reference for the collector, and an equally great launch pad for the novice.
The buyers remained eager for fine lint while sellers preferred to offer their odd lots at higher prices in Sindh and Punjab stations, brokers said.