John Keats

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Noun1.John Keats - Englishman and romantic poet (1795-1821)John Keats - Englishman and romantic poet (1795-1821)
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Keats was drafting Ode on Melancholy at the time, its every fullness poised for dissolution, and inseparable from this knowledge.
They become swept up in heady emotions that inspire the poet to compose some of the greatest works of the Romantic movement, including Ode To A Grecian Urn, Ode On Melancholy and Ode To A Nightingale.
While living next door to her in Hampstead in North London, Keats wrote Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode on Melancholy and Ode to a Nightingale.
Keats and Fanny are slaves to their emotions, that inspire the poet to compose some of the greatest works of the Romantic movement, including Ode to a Grecian Urn, Ode on Melancholy and Ode to a Nightingale.
This passage anticipates important features of the final stanza of Keats's 'Ode on Melancholy', written in 1819 and first published in 1820:
Ode on Melancholy Poem in three stanzas by John Keats, John, published in Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St.
He wrote "La Belle Dame Sanskrit Merci, " a haunting and mysterious ballad, and began to compose his great odes " Ode on Melancholy, " Ode on a Grecian Urn, " Ode to Psyche, " Ode to a Nightingale -- adapting elements of the rhyme - scheme of both Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnets.
I can already hear the ear-deafening cry of the phenomenologist--"Back to the texts!"--and so I turn to Keats's "Ode on Melancholy" as a symptomatic text for addressing these issues.
The title of this engaging new book on Keats's odes appears to make "contemporary criticism" a principal subject; the preface proclaims the four "dominant critical paradigms of the present" to be the New Criticism, Paul de Manian deconstruction, the New Historicism, and Freudian psychoanalysis; and the contents page shows that each of the book's four chapters is devoted to one of Keats's major odes--in order, Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode on Melancholy, and To Autumn.