ode

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ode

 (ōd)
n.
1. A lyric poem of some length, usually of a serious or meditative nature and having an elevated style and formal stanzaic structure.
2.
a. A choric song of classical Greece, often accompanied by a dance and performed at a public festival or as part of a drama.
b. A classical Greek poem modeled on the choric ode and usually having a three-part structure consisting of a strophe, an antistrophe, and an epode.

[French, choric song, from Old French, from Late Latin ōdē, ōda, from Greek aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

od′ic (ō′dĭk) adj.

ode

(əʊd)
n
1. (Poetry) a lyric poem, typically addressed to a particular subject, with lines of varying lengths and complex rhythms. See also Horatian ode, Pindaric ode
2. (Poetry) (formerly) a poem meant to be sung
[C16: via French from Late Latin ōda, from Greek ōidē, from aeidein to sing]

ode

(oʊd)

n.
a lyric poem, typically with an irregular metrical form and expressing exalted or enthusiastic emotion.
[1580–90; < Middle French < Late Latin ōda < Greek aoidḗ song, derivative of aeídein to sing]
od′ic, adj.

-ode1

,
a suffix appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “like,” “having the nature of”; used to form nouns: phyllode. Compare -oid.
[< Greek -ōdēs]

-ode2

,
a combining form meaning “way,” “path,” used esp. in the names of devices through which electrical current passes: electrode.
[< Greek -odos, comb. form of hodós]

ode

A lyric poem, usually in elaborate form, typically addressed to and eulogizing a particular subject.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ode - a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
lyric poem, lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
epithalamium - an ode honoring a bride and bridegroom
Horatian ode, Sapphic ode - an ode with several stanzas
Pindaric, Pindaric ode - an ode form used by Pindar; has triple groups of triple units
choral ode - ode sung by the chorus in classical Greek drama
Translations
قَصيدَه غِنائِيَّه
óda
ode
oodi
óda
óîur, lofsöngur
odė
oda
odă
óda
ode

ode

[əʊd] Noda f

ode

[ˈəʊd] node f

ode

nOde f (→ to, on an +acc)

ode

[əʊd] node f

ode

(əud) noun
a poem written to a person or thing. `Ode to a Nightingale' was written by John Keats.
References in classic literature ?
All things in these Odes collected by Confucius belong to the surface of life; they are the work of those who easily plough light furrows, knowing nothing of hidden gold.
Perhaps these Odes may best be compared with the little craftless figures in an early age of pottery, when the fragrance of the soil yet lingered about the rough clay.
But the odes of Keats and of Wordsworth, a poem or two by Coleridge, a few more by Shelley, discovered vast realms of the spirit that none had explored before.
He had most of Horace by heart, and had got into the habit of connecting this particular walk with certain odes which he repeated duly, at the same time noting the condition of his flowers, and stooping now and again to pick any that were withered or overblown.
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
You know Felicity has a birthday next week," he said, "and I want to write her an ode.
Leo Hunter professed her perfect willingness to recite the ode again, her kind and considerate friends wouldn't hear of it on any account; and the refreshment room being thrown open, all the people who had ever been there before, scrambled in with all possible despatch-- Mrs.
The Ode on a Grecian Urn is more lovely now than when it was written, because for a hundred years lovers have read it and the sick at heart taken comfort in its lines.
The Woggle-Bug was head professor at the Royal College of Oz, and he had composed a fine Ode in honor of Ozma's birthday.
An ode in four hundred lines would not have seemed so touching to Esther; her eyes filled with happy tears; yes, here was the father of whom she had dreamed, whom Dick had described; simple, enthusiastic, unworldly, kind, a painter at heart, and a fine gentleman in manner.
As it was, every one was conscious that by observing certain rules, such as punctuality and quiet, by cooking well, and performing other small duties, one ode after another was satisfactorily restored to the world, and they shared the continuity of the scholar's life.
The book contains a broad selection of odes, some silly, some themed to a season or holiday, and others just to say "I love you.