Odin

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Related to Odhin: Othinn, Alfadur

O·din

 (ō′dĭn)
n. Norse Mythology
The god of wisdom, war, art, culture, and the dead, and the supreme deity and creator of the cosmos and humans.

[Old Norse Ōdhinn; see wet- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Odin

(ˈəʊdɪn) or

Othin

n
(Norse Myth & Legend) Norse myth the supreme creator god; the divinity of wisdom, culture, war, and the dead. Germanic counterpart: Wotan or Woden
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

O•din

(ˈoʊ dɪn)

n.
the principal god of pagan Scandinavia.
[< Old Norse Ōthinn; c. Old English Wōden, Old Saxon Woden, Old High German Wuotan; compare Woden]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Odin - (Norse mythology) ruler of the AesirOdin - (Norse mythology) ruler of the Aesir; supreme god of war and poetry and knowledge and wisdom (for which he gave an eye) and husband of Frigg; identified with the Teutonic Wotan
Norse mythology - the mythology of Scandinavia (shared in part by Britain and Germany) until the establishment of Christianity
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Odin
References in periodicals archive ?
But family life is very important and Mark is also dad to Claea, six, and four-year-old Odhin.
It is true, it shares with Old English the love for kenningar, but in so many cases variation (via kenningar) would rather serve mythologically clearly profiled, "mythologically denotative" needs than connotative-associative ones as they often do in Old English: each one of the names of Odhin designates a specific role of his in a specific incident, saga, myth.