Stalinism

(redirected from Official communism)
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Sta·lin·ism

 (stä′lə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The bureaucratic, authoritarian exercise of state power and mechanistic application of Marxist-Leninist principles associated with Stalin.

Sta′lin·ist adj. & n.
Sta′lin·ize′ v.

Stalinism

(ˈstɑːlɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the theory and form of government associated with Stalin: a variant of Marxism-Leninism characterized by totalitarianism, rigid bureaucracy, and loyalty to the state
ˈStalinist n, adj

Sta•lin•ism

(ˈstɑ ləˌnɪz əm)

n.
the principles and practice of communism associated with Stalin, characterized by the extreme suppression of opposition, totalitarian rule, and an aggressive foreign policy.
[1925–30]
Sta′lin•ist, n., adj.

Stalinism

the communistic theories and practices developed by Joseph Stalin from Marxism and Leninism, especially his development of the cult of the individual with himself at its center, his advocacy of national revolution, and his extensive use of secret police and slave-labor camps to reduce opposition. — Stalinist, n., adj. — Stalinistic, adj.
See also: Communism

Stalinism

The form of communist theory or practice associated with Joseph Stalin, typified by totalitarianism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Stalinism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)Stalinism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
Translations
stalinismo
stalinismi
staljinizam
sztálinizmus
stalinismo

Stalinism

[ˈstɑːlɪnɪzəm] Nestalinismo m

Stalinism

[ˈstɑːlɪˌnɪzəm] nstalinismo
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) Freeden doubts how far even the varieties of official communism were held together by shared core concepts.
Within those sections of the globe where communist governments held state power, the varied responses made by communist parties and movements to the crushing of the Prague Spring and the deepening of the Sino-Soviet split revealed sharply different assessments of the shifting centres of political gravity within 'official communism'.