oflag


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oflag

(ˈɒfˌlɑːɡ)
n
(Military) a German prisoner-of-war camp for officers in World War II
[German, short for Offizierslager officers' camp]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
HERO Jack was one of many sent in cattle trucks to Oflag 79 officers' camp in Brunswick.
He escaped, was recaptured and then sent to Oflag IVc, better known as Colditz.
It is over 70 years since the club opened its doors, following its conception in the Oflag 79 Prisoner of War camp in Brunswick, Germany, during World War II.
Blair hid in a handcart full of beds being taken to a shed beyond the gates of Oflag V-B at Biberach, Germany.
How was Oflag IV-C better known during World War II?
A first lieutenant in the 168th Infantry, 34th Infantry Division, he was captured in 1943 in Tunisia and held in the Oflag 64 prisoner-of-war camp in Schubin, Poland, for 27 months.
The officers went to Oflag VIIB camp at Eichstatt, Bavaria and the men to Stalag VIIIB at Lamsdorf, farther east in Upper Silesia.
The phenomenon oflag in application ofthe measures of monetary policy, Economic Research--Ekonomska Istraiivanja 24(2): 10 p.
Serbian officers were the main occupants of Camp Oflag XIII-B.
(12) From October 1942 most of the British POWs, including significant numbers of Australians, who were able to identify themselves as NCOs and who exercised their prerogative of not working were concentrated in Stalag 383 in Bavarian Hohenfels, formerly the Oflag XIII C.
What was the main characteristic of a German 'oflag' prisoner-of-war camp?
Ricoeur spent nearly two years in Oflag IID, an imprisonment camp for French soldiers, located near Gross-Born.