Ogooué

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Related to Ogooue River: Lambarene

Ogooué

(ɒˈɡəʊweɪ) or

Ogowe

n
(Placename) a river in W central Africa, rising in SW Congo-Brazzaville and flowing generally northwest and north through Gabon to the Atlantic. Length: about 970 km (683 miles)
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References in periodicals archive ?
[1.] Friel JP, Vigliotta TR (2006) Synodontis acanthopera, a new species from the Ogooue River system, Gabon with comments on spiny ornamentation and sexual dimorphism in Mochokid Catfishes (Siluriformes: Mochokidae).
Finally, Ndende, a Kota or Chiwa speaker from near Ovan, took the movement to the regional capital, Booue, and to Okande villages south of the Ogooue River. (15) It is to Ndende that Zembote probably referred when he said that Emane had sent people to Woleu-Ntem to remove Fang reliquary objects.
Port-Gentil is located in western Gabon, on an island in the Ogooue River estuary east of Cape Lopez.
The tree stumps are joined together with steel cables and towed down the Ogooue River towards the port.
On 13 May 1899, a Catholic missionary stationed at the eastern Gabonese town of Franceville learned from some European visitors of a very troubling journey down the Ogooue River. The river had served as the main means of communication for Gabon for many centuries prior to French colonisation in the second half of nineteenth century, and canoe convoys carried supplies and personnel on the Ogooue to Franceville for priests, administrators, and French traders alike.
Adouma canoe workers had long transported goods and people on the Ogooue River, which had long served as the central means of trade in Gabon.
Other sources help to reconstruct the tactics and motivations of the African communities Lenz encountered on the Ogooue River. French travelers such as Alfred Marche, Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza, and others discussed the same communities and often the same individuals whom Lenz encountered.
Local leaders controlled navigation on the Ogooue River by threatening to use supernatural forces to harm those imprudent enough to try to bypass them, and Lenz found he could not easily ignore such tactics.
While in Gabon, he frequently drank tap water, ate food sold by street vendors, and had repeated fresh water contact while swimming in the Ogooue River. He exhibited no symptoms during his trip.
What she saw when the Ogooue River steamer put ashore at Lambarene was a cluster of wooden buildings with galvanized steel roofs.
Henri Gouraud at Guelemou, Ivory Coast, on the upper Cavally River (September 29, 1898); he was exiled on the island of Ndjole in the Ogooue River in Gabon, where he died (June 2, 1900).