Ogooué

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Ogooué

(ɒˈɡəʊweɪ) or

Ogowe

n
(Placename) a river in W central Africa, rising in SW Congo-Brazzaville and flowing generally northwest and north through Gabon to the Atlantic. Length: about 970 km (683 miles)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
One day, looking at a herd of hippos in the Ogowe River, he developed his idea of "reverence for life." According to it, "The greatest evil is to destroy life, to injure life, to repress life which is capable of development." In 1952 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
When the Paris Mission Society refused to support him because he was judged theologically unorthodox, he raised the money himself, and went to the French colony of Gabon where he built a simple hospital 150 miles inland on the banks of the Ogowe River.
At the end of March 1913, Schweitzer and his wife went to Bordeaux, from where they started their sea journey to Port-Gentil, and then further 280 km up to the Ogowe river, and they finally arrived in Lambarene.
(23) Holt became familiar with the Angolan market in the 1870s through a small-scale commission trade with British agents in Luanda, but he never wanted to expand his own business further south than the Ogowe River in modern Gabon.
The Italian/French explorer, Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza, nominally employed by the French government, had been on an expedition up the Ogowe River in the 1870s in the vicinity of the Congo Basin (in what is now Gabon), and had succeeded in concluding a series of treaties with King Makoko of the Teke people.
This basin is bounded by the watersheds (or mountain ridges) of the adjacent basins, namely, in particular, those of the Niari, the Ogowe, the Schari, and the Nile, on the north; by the eastern watershed line of the affluents of Lake Tanganyika on the east; and by the watersheds of the basins of the Zambesi and the Loge on the south.
An article he chanced to see in a magazine determined the form this would take: Doctors were needed at the Lambarene Mission on the Ogowe River in the French colony of Gabon in Central Africa.
She encountered cannibals and crocodiles, studied the religious customs of the mysterious Fang tribe, climbed Mount Cameroon and explored the Ogowe River, trading cloth for ivory and rubber to fund her trip.