Ohm's law

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Related to Ohms Law: Kirchoff's Law

Ohm's law

 (ōmz)
n.
The law stating that the direct current flowing in a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference between its ends. It is usually formulated as V = IR, where V is the potential difference, or voltage, I is the current, and R is the resistance of the conductor.

[After Georg Simon Ohm.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ohm's law

n
(General Physics) the principle that the electric current passing through a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference across it, provided that the temperature remains constant. The constant of proportionality is the resistance of the conductor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ohm's law

A law stating that the current in an electric circuit is equal to the voltage divided by the resistance. The current increases as the voltage increases, but decreases as the resistance increases.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ohm's law - electric current is directly proportional to voltage and inversely proportional to resistance; I = E/R
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ohms law is then used to calculate the resistance based on the difference between the two on load voltages and the two currents.
Using Ohms law, the testing equipment displays the apparent soil resistance in [Q] for a given electrode spacing (i.e.