Ojibwa


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O·jib·wa

 (ō-jĭb′wā′, -wə) also O·jib·way (-wā′) or O·jib·we (-wĕ)
n. pl. Ojibwa or O·jib·was also Ojibway or O·jib·ways or Ojibwe or O·jib·wes
1. A member of a Native American people originally located north of Lake Huron before moving westward in the 1600s and 1700s into Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, western Ontario, and Manitoba, with later migrations onto the northern Great Plains in North Dakota, Montana, and Saskatchewan.
2. The Algonquian language of the Ojibwa. In both senses also called Chippewa.

[Ojibwa ojibwe.]

Ojibwa

(əʊˈdʒɪbwə)
npl -was or -wa
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people living in a region west of Lake Superior
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family
Also: Chippewa

O•jib•wa

(oʊˈdʒɪb weɪ, -wə)

also O•jib•way

(-weɪ)

n., pl. -was also -ways, (esp. collectively) -wa also -way.
1. a member of an American Indian people of Canada and the U.S., living principally in a region around Lakes Huron and Superior, extending W and N of Lake Superior to Saskatchewan and N Ontario.
2. the Algonquian language shared by the Ojibwa, Ottawa, and Algonquins.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ojibwa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake SuperiorOjibwa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake Superior
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
Buffalo Indian, Plains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North America
2.Ojibwa - the Algonquian language spoken by the Ojibwa
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
References in classic literature ?
In the Ojibwa tongue, disaster; an unexpected affliction that strikes hard.
For Hascall and his Ojibwa people, spirituality is based on relationship with the family, which is strengthened through sacrifice.
Schoolcraft married the daughter of an Ojibwa woman and a fur trader.
Born in England, Belany emigrated to Canada in 1906, joined an Ojibwa band and later became famous as the naturalist Grey Owl, assumed to be an Indian.
The sacred object, called a totem (derived from the term used by the Ojibwa Indians), is representative of the kinship group.
An Ojibwa, Sigafus will be dressed in her traditional Native regalia and will present on Native culture through oral traditions, language, and history.
A single volume on the subject of the Ojibwa people might seem like quite a challenge.
Fontaine, an Ojibwa from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba, is the head of the province's missing and murdered aboriginal women and girls strategy.
We lashed on our 56-inch chestnut Ojibwa snowshoes and it wasn't long before the babiche was clicking along nicely over the metre of snow in a marvelous stand of mature even-aged pine.
Even better, we would explore some of the beliefs and myths of the culture of Native North Americans, particularly the Ojibwa tribe.
For example, Tiffany's Granny Ruth frequently uses Ojibwa but, other than holding the words in the speech bubbles, Kooistra draws no more attention to this difference than necessary.
With the smoke you ask for the good spirits to stay and the negative spirits to go away," says Eddy Robinson, Ojibwa cultural educator and founder of Morningstar River, which provides aboriginal culture education.