Okeghem

Okeghem

(ˈɒkəˌɡɛm; Dutch ˈɔkəxəm)
n
(Biography) a variant spelling of Ockeghem
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What was unexpected was the number of documents concerning composers and singers who had not worked for the popes, among them luminaries such as Okeghem and Busnoys, and also the many music institutions they served, including the illustrious court chapels of Burgundy, France, Milan, Naples, Savoy, and the Holy Roman Empire.
Okeghem Ma bouchc A [lii.sup.v] - rit/ Iiii Ha cuer liii' - liv pervers 42.
Okeghem's Missa cuiusvis toni is in Johannes Ockeghem: Masses and Mass sections, ed J.
The composer's path intersected with those of musical greats - surely with the influential Antoine Busnoys, and probably with the even more prestigious Jean Okeghem. A mid-sixteenth-century legend has it that Obrecht taught music to Erasmus.
Thus, when encountering a reference to Ernst Krenek's article "A Discussion of the Treatment of Dissonances in Okeghem's Masses as Compared with the Contrapuntal Theory of Johannes Tinctoris," listed as appearing in "HSM" (p.
okeghem by Pierre-Paul Vieillot (Senilis) dated C-1471, a humanistic encomium with an intriguing reference to a `dear Michael', who `died lamentably yesterday by cruel death' (Leofranc Holford-Strevens's translation).
Among the larger and more famous documents around 1400 reproduced here are the Utrecht and Leiden fragments, the Ghent fragments recently described by Reinhard Strohm, the single leaf in Brussels containing part of the Okeghem Missa Sine nomine (the pier e on its reverse, the commentary could have mentioned, is by Binchois, identified by Andrew Kirkman), and the Amsterdam fragments described by Rob Wegman.
But an interpretation based on gematria depends on particular spellings of the names, and these might well have been "Okeghem" and "Hobrecht" rather than "Ockeghem" and "Obrecht," spellings that are found as frequently as their alternatives in contemporary musical and archival sources.
Perkins, "The L'Homme Arme Masses of Busnoys and Okeghem: A Comparison," The Journal of Musicology 3 (Fall 1984): 363--96; Christopher Reynolds, "The Counterpoint of Allusion in Fifteenth-Century Masses," Journal of the American Musicological Society 45 (Summer 1992): 228--60.
A particular rhythmic pattern, of which Binchois was very fond in his secular music, turns up with surprising frequency in Regis's motets, with their cantilena-like melodies-and in a few works by Okeghem, including his deploration on Binchois, which was reconsidered by Richard Wexler, especially from the biographical point of view.
The biographical chapters in particular are a pleasure to read, for Wegman has a flair for narrative, and the information available on Obrecht's biography is uncommonly rich for a 15th-century composer; such a clear portrait is simply not possible for Okeghem, Busnoys or Josquin, at least not yet.
The opening of Okeghem's Salve regina as recently recorded by the Clerk's Group, one of the most gloriously right performances of such music I have ever heard, is exactly at MM60 for the modern [Musical Expression Omitted] (Okeghem's [Musical Expression Omitted] in perfect time [Musical Expression Omitted]).