oke

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oke

(əʊk)
n
(Units) another name for oka

oke

(əʊk)
adj, adv
informal another term for O.K.

oke

(əʊk)
n
South African an informal word for man
[from Afrikaans]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•ka1

(ˈoʊ kə)

also oke



n., pl. o•kas.
1. a unit of weight in Turkey and neighboring countries, equal to about 2¾ pounds (1.25 kilograms).
2. a unit of liquid measure, equal to about 1? U.S. liquid quarts (1.26 liters).
[1615–25; < Italian occa < Turkish okka < Arabic (compare ūquiyya) < Greek ounkíā, c. Latin uncia; see ounce1]

o•ka2

(ˈoʊ kə)

n., pl. o•kas.

O•ka

(oʊˈkɑ)

n.
a river in the central Russian Federation in Europe, flowing NE to the Volga at Nizhni Novgorod. 950 mi. (1530 km) long.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Defense plants, not the New Deal, would put the Okies back to work, and Mexican workers would once again play a key role in California agriculture.
The implication of these historical references is perfectly clear: If we could reconstruct our retirement system from scratch, would it really be the same as the Social Security designed for dusty-faced Okies and spiked-helmeted Prussians?
The highway originally got its fame from the days of the Great Depression, when Okies fled to California looking for jobs and land that wouldn't blow away.
Californies, desert, Dust Bowl, Gokies, Good Deal, Great Depression, Great Drought, Great Impression, Hokies, Mexico, New Deal, No Deal, oceans, Okies, Oklahoma, Franklin D.
One of which is the freedom from the tyranny of born-again, country-fried Okies like you and the one we just got out of office.
The novel, which originally moved the emotions with its depiction of the hard lives of Okies who migrated to California during the Depression, is now of course a quaint antique.
He witnessed the effect of the Great Dust Bowl on people's lives and followed "Okies" to California.
The <IR> JOADS </IR> , Steinbeck's central figures, are " <IR> OKIES </IR> ," farmers moving west from a land of drought and bankruptcy to seek work as migrant fruit-pickers in California.
However, the arrival of the Okies, a large, skilled, English-speaking labor force whose migrant status left them bereft of any governmental protection, appeared to be a tremendous windfall to the growers cartel.
Evicted by landlords willing to use machines and low-cost laborers to harvest crops, displaced white tenants joined a growing pool of mostly Mexican and black agricultural workers as off-white Okies and Arkies.
That's a major reason why moving to California - immortalized in popular tunes as absurdly different as "California, Here I Come" and Led Zeppelin's "Going to California" - is to participate in a great mythic American adventure, one expansive and resilient enough to encompass the experience of gold miners in the 1840s, movie pioneers in the 1910s, Okies in the Depression, hippies in the '60s, and continual waves of immigrants from all over the world.
This modern-day "The Grapes of Wrath" follows a mother and daughter, who -- like Okies before them -- move to California to seek greener economic pastures but instead fall into a relentless downward spiral of poverty and homelessness.