Old Bill


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Old Bill

n
1. a policeman
2. the Old Bill (functioning as plural) policemen collectively or in general
[C20: of uncertain origin: perhaps derived from the World War I cartoon of a soldier with a drooping moustache]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The former Westminster Road Police and Fire Station, on Westminster Road, in Kirkdale - which also served time as a well-known match-day pub called The Old Bill - is being transformed into 10 apartments.
It shows Old Bill and another soldier huddled in a crater with shells whizzing over their heads.
His main character was Old Bill, who appears in many works.
Support comes from Teesside's own 'sinister light entertainment band' Old Muggins, who may even stick their ventriloquist's dummy Old Bill under the mistletoe for a quick Christmas peck.
Captain Bruce Bairnsfather, whose last cartoon was published in the Birmingham Weekly Post in January 1959, was best known for his character, Old Bill.
Another is that it refers to a popular sergeant from the 1860s called Bill Smith, or Old Bill.
The Old Bill and Bull Pub in Coventry Road, for example, was built by Worcester County Council (as a police station) as part of attempting to persuade Yardley to remain in Worcestershire.
But it's precisely because of those youthful years as an over-acting intergalactic heartthrob that we can forgive the old Bill pretending to be, well, Old Bill, despite things getting a little too tight around the waistband for him to really convince as member of LA's finest.
People are going to be desperately unhappy when they realise how their money is being The old bill.
A little faster than the Old Bill arrived I must say.
There had been military cartoon characters long before Old Bill, of course--perhaps the earliest being Thomas Rowlandson's young army officer Johnny Newcome from the Peninsular War and Captain Atkinson's 'Our Griff' from the Indian Mutiny.