Old Chinese


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Old Chinese

n.
The Chinese language in the first millennium bc, in which the earliest Confucian classics were written. Its pronunciation is reconstructed from the analysis of the development of Chinese characters and from rhymes in poetry.
References in classic literature ?
He quoted an old, old Chinese text, backed it with another, and reinforced these with a third.
Parsons said Jones told him she found the sign offensive because it said "No Ticky-No Washy," which Parsons said was an old Chinese slogan.
Chapters 2 to 5 outline the phonological history of Chinese and are arranged chronologically: a chapter on prehistory, containing a discussion of the place of Chinese in the Sino-Tibetan language family, is followed by chapters on Old Chinese, Middle Chinese, and Early Modem Chinese.
Beautiful one year old Chinese take out restaurant with13 seats on a busy road in a strip center across from a super walmart.
So he walks into the shop and sees an old Chinese gentleman behind the counter.
There's an old Chinese proverb: "You can buy a clock, but not time.
And it seems that the 1,500 year old Chinese porcelain industry also played a part in influencing some of the designs on British ceramics.
Schuessler (emeritus, Wartburg College, Iowa) provides information on the origin of Old Chinese words, including possible word family relationships within Chinese and outside contacts.
Spears and Williams, both former Blimpie franchise owners, invested $250,000 from personal savings, proceeds from the sale of their Blimpie properties, and a home equity loan to turn an old Chinese restaurant into the first Nemos Seafood.
He retrieved old Chinese statues, a Buddhist bench, Italian carvings and landscape paintings from the 5,400-square-foot custom-built home he shares with a roommate.
IT IS BETTER TO LIGHT A CANDLE THAN TO CURSE THE darkness," says an old Chinese proverb.
IT IS NOT quite a church yet but this Sunday (as in any given Sunday) a nondescript two-storey building on the outskirts of China's capital is teeming with young and old Chinese sitting quietly in Formica chairs, reverently clutching a Mandarin-language Bible.