Old English


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Related to Old English: Middle English

Old English

n.
1. The English language from the middle of the 5th to the beginning of the 12th century. Also called Anglo-Saxon.
2. Printing See black letter.

Old English

n
1. (Languages) Also called: Anglo-Saxon the English language from the time of the earliest settlements in the fifth century ad to about 1100. The main dialects were West Saxon (the chief literary form), Kentish, and Anglian. Abbreviation: OE Compare Middle English, Modern English
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a Gothic typeface commonly used in England up until the 18th century

Old′ Eng′lish


n.
1. the English language before c1150. Abbr.: OE
2. Print. a style of black letter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Old English - English prior to about 1100
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
West Saxon - a literary dialect of Old English
Anglian - one of the major dialects of Old English
Jutish, Kentish - one of the major dialects of Old English
Translations
stará angličtina
altenglisch
muinaisenglanti
anglosaxonanglo-saxonvieil anglais
古英語
gammalengelskgammelengelsk
inglês antigo

old English

ninglese m antico
References in classic literature ?
And so saying, he reached the harp, and entertained his guest with the following characteristic song, to a sort of derry-down chorus, appropriate to an old English ditty.
The father and mother were in the old English style, and the young people in the new.
Though no more Old English than the works of Kipling, it had selected its reminiscences so adroitly that her criticism was lulled, and the guests whom it was nourishing for imperial purposes bore the outer semblance of Parson Adams or Tom Jones.
The old English muse was frank, guileless, sincere, and although very learned, still learned without art.
The taste for the old English dramatists I believe I have never formed.
But you must remember that old English poetry was not like ours.
By old English statutory law, the whale is declared a royal fish.
I replied in our good old English tongue merely to convince him that neither of us could understand the other; but I noticed that when I smiled slightly on concluding, he did likewise.
As descendants of old English nobles still cherish in the traditions of their houses how that this king or that king tarried a day with some favored ancestor three hundred years ago, no doubt the descendants of the woman of Samaria, living there in Shechem, still refer with pardonable vanity to this conversation of their ancestor, held some little time gone by, with the Messiah of the Christians.
A woman should be able to sit down and play you or sing you a good old English tune.
As great men are urged on to the abuse of power (when they need urging, which is not often), by their flatterers and dependents, so old John was impelled to these exercises of authority by the applause and admiration of his Maypole cronies, who, in the intervals of their nightly pipes and pots, would shake their heads and say that Mr Willet was a father of the good old English sort; that there were no new-fangled notions or modern ways in him; that he put them in mind of what their fathers were when they were boys; that there was no mistake about him; that it would be well for the country if there were more like him, and more was the pity that there were not; with many other original remarks of that nature.
You could not live among such people; you are stifled for want of an outlet toward something beautiful, great, or noble; you are irritated with these dull men and women, as a kind of population out of keeping with the earth on which they live,--with this rich plain where the great river flows forever onward, and links the small pulse of the old English town with the beatings of the world's mighty heart.