old hand

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old hand

n.
One who is experienced; a veteran: an old hand at international politics.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

old hand

n
1. a person who is skilled at something through long experience
2. informal Austral (in the 19th century) an ex-convict
3. informal Austral a person who is long established in a place
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

old′ hand′


n.
a person with long experience in a subject, area, procedure, etc.; veteran.
[1775–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.old hand - an experienced person who has been through many battlesold hand - an experienced person who has been through many battles; someone who has given long service
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

old hand

noun veteran, expert, master, pro (informal), old-timer, old soldier, past master, trouper, warhorse (informal), old stager, one of the old school He is an old hand at organizing training courses.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

old hand

noun
One who has had long experience in a given activity or capacity:
Informal: old-timer, vet.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خَبير، ذو تَجْرِبَه
gammel rotte
tapasztalt vén róka
gamall í hettunni, vanur
starý macher
tecrübeli kimse

old

(əuld) adjective
1. advanced in age. an old man; He is too old to live alone.
2. having a certain age. He is thirty years old.
3. having existed for a long time. an old building; Those trees are very old.
4. no longer useful. She threw away the old shoes.
5. belonging to times long ago. old civilizations like that of Greece.
old age
the later part of a person's life. He wrote most of his poems in his old age.
old boy/girl
a former pupil (of a school). The new prime minister is an old boy of our school.
ˌold-ˈfashioned adjective
in a style common some time ago. old-fashioned clothes; Her hairstyle is very old-fashioned.
old hand
a person who is very experienced. He's an old hand at this sort of job.
old maid
an unmarried woman who is past the usual age of marriage.
the old
old people. hospitals for the old.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Well, well; I heard Ahab mutter, "Here some one thrusts these cards into these old hands of mine; swears that I must play them, and no others." And damn me, Ahab, but thou actest right; live in the game, and die it!
Then all the old hands remembered that a certain dry mead, into which a few of the cows had been admitted of late, had, in years gone by, spoilt the butter in the same way.
There they await the onslaught, the inexperienced ones clutching their revolvers and treading on twigs, but the old hands sleeping tranquilly until just before the dawn.
"I think so, too," said her ladyship, crossing her handsome old hands resolutely on her lap.
Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.
The little old priest in his ecclesiastical cap, with his long silvery-gray locks of hair parted behind his ears, was fumbling with something at the lectern, putting out his little old hands from under the heavy silver vestment with the gold cross on the back of it.
My old eyes have seen them--ay, and those old hands touched them too; for I have helped her, scores of times.'
The moment she moved her head, her attention was claimed by a pair of tremulous gouty old hands, offering her a grouse pie, profusely sprinkled with truffles.
It was past seven o'clock at night when the grand- mother came home with the pocket-book held tightly in her old hands and she was so excited she could scarcely speak.
You old hands got so wise, that a child cannot cough, or sneeze, but you see desperation and ruin at hand.
He choked and gulped and suddenly tears ran down his weather-wrinkled cheeks as he struck his old hands together.
I devoted a considerable amount of attention to the subject at one time, and was getting on, as I thought, fairly well; but the old hands told me that I should never be any real good at it, and advised me to give it up.