Old High German


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Old High German

n.
High German from the middle of the 800s to about 1100.

Old High German

n
(Languages) a group of West Germanic dialects that eventually developed into modern German; High German up to about 1200: spoken in the Middle Ages on the upper Rhine, in Bavaria, Alsace, and elsewhere, including Alemannic, Bavarian, Langobardic, and Upper Franconian. Abbreviation: OHG

Old′ High′ Ger′man


n.
the High German dialects before c1100. Abbr.: OHG
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Old High German - High German prior to 1200
German language, High German, German - the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Old English and Old High German are no exceptions, but their word order has usually been studied with the use of prose texts.
Old High German, however, primarily uses the definite article for definite expressions in the thematic part indicating their anaphoric potential.
18) As "bachelor, unmarried man," it occurs in the Old English Scriftboc and in glosses of Latin caelebs; elsewhere, this sense appears in Old High German glosses, and survives as Modern German Hagestolz.
As is naturally expected, Old High German Tatian has gilouben in in the corresponding parts of the Gospels.
A similar text marks an Old High German harmony, datable in the ninth century.
The sole survivor in Old High German is the Hildebrandslied (c.
Historically, Kling's allusions run the gamut from the Old High German poet Otfried von WeiBenburg--whose words on the irregularities and balance of the German language stand as motto to the volume--to the eighteen-year-old Hare Krishna devotees on the streets of post-Cold War Leningrad.
These papers traverse a wide geography, dealing with issues of relationships, linkages, literacies, and the social context of interactions with Latin of a smorgasbord of antique and medieval languages, including Middle Welsh, Greek, Old Swedish, and related Scandinavian languages, Old and Middle Irish, Old English, a number of Romance languages (such as Castilian, Leonese, Old and Middle French, Gaulish Latin), and Old High German.
Influence of text type on word order of old Germanic languages; a corpus-based contrastive study of Old English and Old High German.
In the second section, entitled' Wort- and Begriffsgeschichten', the first contribution is from Kurt Gartner on tihten/dichten, in which he carefully traces the history of the word from Old High German and its Latin Christian origins, through to New High German, where it undergoes a narrowing of meaning.
Soul and 'Seele' (German) are related to Old High German 'sela', supposed to have a connotation with 'see' (lake or sea), since both the unborn and the dead were believed to dwell in water.
So is the case with type III (allegedly the infixing type) which is represented primarily by Old High German and Old Nordic (West Scandinavian) data, the so ca lled r-preterites.