Old Northwest


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Old Northwest: Old Southwest

Old Northwest

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Old Northwest

n
(Placename) (in the early US) the land between the Great Lakes, the Mississippi, and the Ohio River. Awarded to the US in 1783, it was organized into the Northwest Territory in 1787 and now forms the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, and part of Minnesota. See also Northwest Territory
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Onuf (who is the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor of History - Emeritus, at the University of Virginia) is an authoritative account of the origins and early history of American policy for territorial government, land distribution, and the admission of new states in the Old Northwest. In a new preface, Professor Onuf reviews important new work on the progress of colonization and territorial expansion in the rising American empire.
Another valuable offering is Jonathan Todd Hancock's demonstration of how the course of the war in the Old Northwest was shaped as much by the internal politics of Native American groups as it was by the conflict between these peoples and white settlers.
Land Too Good for Indians addresses the Indian Wars in the Ohio Valley and the old Northwest from 1785 to the monumental defeat of a tribal force of 900 warriors by General Anthony Wayne and 3,000 Americans at a place called Fallen Timber in Western Ohio in 1794.
Amar makes a much more intricate biographical discussion of Abraham Lincoln and how notions of constitutionalism in Illinois and the Old Northwest shaped Lincoln's understanding of the Republic's constitution and federal supremacy in particular.
An intrepid captain in a highly regarded Delaware regiment, Kirkwood survived the Revolution, only to die fighting Native Americans in the old Northwest Territory.
It tells the story of the rise of Army intelligence in the lower Old Northwest (Midwest) states (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois) and Michigan during the rebellion, and aims to answer two related historical questions: did secret Democratic conspiratorial organizations exist and pose a threat to order in the North?
It was after all the English regime who imagined the Old Northwest Territory of the American continent as a set-aside for the displaced eastern tribes.
In a highly engaging essay, Stacey Robertson explains how women of the Old Northwest managed to construct strong associations across great distances and multiple denominations.
The essays in this collection examine the cultural evolution of Native American tribes in the Old Northwest as well as interactions with other cultures such as the French and the Quakers.
English and French explorers, colonists, and missionaries in New England, Canada, and what would later become known as the Old Northwest, left extensive accounts of their encounters with native people and detailed descriptions of the region.