Old Slavonic


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Related to Old Slavonic: Old Slavic

Old Slavonic

or

Old Slavic

n
(Languages) the South Slavonic language up to about 1400: the language of the Macedonian Slavs that developed into Serbo-Croat and Bulgarian. See also Old Church Slavonic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
staroslověnština
praslavenski jezik
праслов'янськапраслов'янська мовастарослов'янськастарослов'янська мова
References in periodicals archive ?
This required the creation of a new service in Greek by the Metropolitan of Russia, (1) who was originally Greek and did not know enough Old Russian or Old Slavonic. The service was immediately translated into Old Slavonic and we do not have any manuscript containing a Greek version.
DakhaBrakha is apparently old Slavonic for give-take - they gave a polished performance and the audience gave back an enthusiastic reception.
More specifically, it derives from the old Slavonic language and means valley, which is no coincidence given Debar's location.
For instance written French and written Bulgarian go back to the same century a mid 9th century for written French and late 9th century for written Bulgarian, or Old Slavonic.
Some were downright anti-religious, seeing Christianity as namby-pamby stuff; others cultivated old Slavonic stuff, and there are surely cultural roots to Eurasianism that Miss Laruelle might have noted: the Stravinsky of Firebird, for instance, is stating a variant of Eurasianism when he celebrates the old myths of Slavdom, from an era when Finns, Tatars and old Slavs intermingled in the forests of Muscovy and Novgorod (it is certainly curious to see Turkish place-names quite far to the north).
There was a Gospel translation into the Old Slavonic language in the late 9th century by Saints Cyril and Methodius.
Examples are plentiful, including a case study of the perfect in Old Slavonic.
The choir has some difficulties with the pronunciation of the Old Slavonic. Some passages are exaggeratedly exalted, and smooth rather than rawly laconic in Janacekian style.
With the help of combined methodologies, Floros defends his conception about deciphering Old Slavonic kondakarian notation, which was considered an enigma for a long time.
Based on the traditional old Slavonic liturgy, it has many passages of beauty in more modern style.
Records of story telling have been found in many languages, including Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Old German, Old Slavonic, Chinese and Icelandic.