old-age pension

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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.old-age pension - a monthly payment made to someone who is retired from work
pension - a regular payment to a person that is intended to allow them to subsist without working
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

old-age pension

[ˌəʊldeɪdʒˈpɛnʃn] npensione f di vecchiaia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
As with the allocation of old-age pensions, the allocation of a disability pension (the amount of the pension, the bank branch and the date of receipt of the disability pension card) will also be reported by SMS, e-mail or an official letter.
The disbursements for old-age pensions accounted for 42.7 per cent of the total pension until the end of May, followed by the non-vocational death rate of 31.5 per cent, followed by cases of disability pension resulting from a non-occupational cause, accounting for 19.2 per cent.
The post Cyprus has third lowest GDP spending on old-age pensions in EU appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
The government of Skvernelis expects the proposed measures would allow raising the average old-age pensions by 27.5 per cent by 2020, in light of the growing economy and salary fund.
The relevant evidence is the dramatic increase of government expenditure on old-age pensions in OECD countries from an average of 6.1% of gross domestic product (GDP) in 1990 to 7.8% in 2009, 27% faster than the growth in national income.
The minimum wage amount in Uzbekistan starting from September will be 107,635 sums ($35.8) per month; old-age pensions and allowances for the disabled people - 210,525 sums ($70); benefits for the elderly and disabled citizens who do not have the required work experience - 129,180 sums ($43).
You can continue to work and delay receipt of your retirement and state old-age pension. It's also possible to continue to work and receive your retirement and state old-age pensions.
In this article I compare the approach of three governments, those of Fisher in Australia, Ballance and then Seddon in New Zealand and Asquith in the United Kingdom (UK) to three issues of the day--progressive taxation, old-age pensions and the rights of women.
Which British chancellor of the exchequer introduced old-age pensions and national insurance?
Many readers would like to be in the writer's position where the husband and wife have full old-age pensions and guaranteed occupational pensions on top.
In Germany, first pillar old-age pensions are already closely linked to the insurance career during whole working life.