pepper spray

(redirected from Oleoresin Capsicum spray)
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pepper spray

n.
An aerosol containing the irritant capsaicin, used to immobilize or incapacitate a person or animal, especially one that is an attacker.

[From the capsaicin content derived from capsicum peppers.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pepper spray

n
1. (Chemistry) a defence spray agent derived from hot cayenne peppers, which causes temporary blindness and breathing difficulty, sometimes used to control riots
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a defence spray agent derived from hot cayenne peppers, which causes temporary blindness and breathing difficulty, sometimes used to control riots
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pepper spray - a nonlethal aerosol spray made with the pepper derivative oleoresin capiscumpepper spray - a nonlethal aerosol spray made with the pepper derivative oleoresin capiscum; used to cause temporary blindness and incapacitate an attacker; also used as a bear deterrent
aerosol can, aerosol container, spray can, aerosol, aerosol bomb - a dispenser that holds a substance under pressure and that can release it as a fine spray (usually by means of a propellant gas)
chemical weapon - chemical substances that can be delivered using munitions and dispersal devices to cause death or severe harm to people and animals and plants
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their M9 pistols, oleoresin capsicum spray, batons, and stun guns are replaced with a whistle, a radio, a Personal Alarm Locating System (PALS) device, and a single pen.
That policy says Oleoresin Capsicum spray, or "OC" as it is commonly called, "will not be used punitively" and "should not be used as a means to disperse crowds" or "against persons engaged only in passive resistance." The policy calls for "a single spray burst of between one and three seconds at the suspect's eyes, nose and mouth," and it says multiple applications "should be avoided."
Airman 1st Class Thomas Hearton, 75th Security Forces Squadron, washes off Oleoresin Capsicum spray from his face at Hill, Air Force Base, Utah.