receptor

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re·cep·tor

 (rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
1. Physiology A specialized cell or group of nerve endings that responds to sensory stimuli.
2. Biochemistry A molecular structure or site on the surface or interior of a cell that binds with substances such as hormones, antigens, or neurotransmitters or is activated by events such as a change in the concentration of an ion.

receptor

(rɪˈsɛptə)
n
1. (Physiology) physiol a sensory nerve ending that changes specific stimuli into nerve impulses
2. any of various devices that receive information, signals, etc

re•cep•tor

(rɪˈsɛp tər)

n.
1. a protein molecule, usu. on the surface of a cell, that is capable of binding to a complementary molecule, as a hormone, antibody, or antigen.
2. a sensory nerve ending or sense organ that is sensitive to stimuli.
[1900–05]

re·cep·tor

(rĭ-sĕp′tər)
1. A nerve ending specialized to sense or receive stimuli. Skin receptors respond to stimuli such as touch and pressure and signal the brain by activating portions of the nervous system. Receptors in the nose detect odors.
2. A cell structure or site that is capable of combining with a hormone, antigen, or other chemical substance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.receptor - a cellular structure that is postulated to exist in order to mediate between a chemical agent that acts on nervous tissue and the physiological responsereceptor - a cellular structure that is postulated to exist in order to mediate between a chemical agent that acts on nervous tissue and the physiological response
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
alpha receptor, alpha-adrenergic receptor, alpha-adrenoceptor - receptors postulated to exist on nerve cell membranes of the sympathetic nervous system in order to explain the specificity of certain agents that affect only some sympathetic activities (such as vasoconstriction and relaxation of intestinal muscles and contraction of smooth muscles)
beta receptor, beta-adrenergic receptor, beta-adrenoceptor - receptors postulated to exist on nerve cell membranes of the sympathetic nervous system in order to explain the specificity of certain agents that affect only some sympathetic activities (such as vasodilation and increased heart beat)
2.receptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulationreceptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulation
lateral line, lateral line organ - sense organs of fish and amphibians; believed to detect pressure changes in the water
organ - a fully differentiated structural and functional unit in an animal that is specialized for some particular function
enteroceptor, interoceptor - any receptor that responds to stimuli inside the body
exteroceptor - any receptor that responds to stimuli outside the body
pineal eye, third eye - a sensory structure capable of light reception located on the dorsal side of the diencephalon in various reptiles
baroreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to pressure
chemoreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to chemical stimuli
thermoreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to heat and cold
eye, oculus, optic - the organ of sight
ear - the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium
organ of hearing - the part of the ear that is responsible for sensations of sound
inner ear, internal ear, labyrinth - a complex system of interconnecting cavities; concerned with hearing and equilibrium
semicircular canal - one of three tube loops filled with fluid and in planes nearly at right angles with one another; concerned with equilibrium
stretch receptor - a receptor in a muscle that responds to stretching of the muscle tissue
papilla - a small nipple-shaped protuberance concerned with taste, touch, or smell; "the papillae of the tongue"
sensory system - the body's system of sense organs
effector - an organ (a gland or muscle) that becomes active in response to nerve impulses
Translations

receptor

[rɪˈseptəʳ] N (Physiol, Rad) → receptor m

receptor

[rɪˈsɛptər] n (ANATOMY)récepteur m

receptor

n
(= nerve)Reizempfänger m, → Rezeptor m
(Rad) → Empfänger m

receptor

[rɪˈsɛptəʳ] nrecettore m

re·cep·tor

n. receptor, terminación nerviosa que recibe un estímulo y lo transmite a otros nervios;
auditory ______ auditivo;
contact ______ de contacto;
mechanoreceptormecanoreceptor;
chemoreceptorquimoreceptor;
proprioceptive ______ propioceptivo;
sensory ______ sensorial;
taste ______ gustativo;
temperature ______ de temperatura.

receptor

n receptor m; estrogen receptor-positive positivo para receptores de estrógeno
References in periodicals archive ?
As a bass breathes or swims, water passes through its two paired nares (nostrils) and over its olfactory organs where olfactory receptor cells detect substances.
Cognitive neuroscientists say smell plays a powerful role in physical attraction because "when inhale a scent, it goes to the olfactory receptor cells at the top our nose then travels to the brain's limbic system which controls memory, emotion and resulting in chemical and physical stimulation.
It is a split-second combination of a specific olfactory receptor in your nose smelling the buttered popcorn chemical, called diacetyl, which causes the nervous system to activate a cell that travels a pre-determined pathway directly to your brain.
A candidate olfactory receptor subtype highly conserved across different insect orders.
The olfactory receptor neurons in the nose work by making physical contact with the molecules composing the odor, and they send this information back to that region of the brain.
One TRP channel that plays a significant role in the development of several diseases is TRPVl, an olfactory receptor, to which researchers have given a great deal of attention.
Inspector "Roger Lapin" from the WYP SSMU (Special Small Mammals Unit) said: "Rabbits are scientifically proven to be able to sniff out drugs as they have 100 million olfactory receptor cells, and they can run very quickly, making short work of chasing suspects.
Renowned sniffers like rats have around 1,200 olfactory receptor genes and dogs about 800.
We know that DEET deters blood feeding by interactions with olfactory receptor cells," Dickens says.
The presence and distribution of receptor proteins on olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is well documented (Buck and Axel, 1991; Ressler et al.
That said, recent studies published in the journal Genome Research, examined the olfactory receptor (OR) range in 13 mammalian species including man.