omnivory


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omnivory

(ɒmˈnɪvərɪ)
n
(Zoology) the state of being omnivorous
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results on the availability and contribution of different food sources to the biomass gain reinforce previous knowledge on the omnivory of prawn and their plasticity in the use of food sources.
The role of omnivory in a Neotropical stream: separating diurnal and nocturnal effects.
Omnivory of an Insular Lizard: Sources of Variation in the Diet of Podarcis lilfordi (Squamata, Lacertidae), Plos One, 11(2): 1-32.
Predatory, Omnivory, Herbivory, Aphid husbandry, Fungus farming).
2014), assessed degree of omnivory in human diets (Fogel and Tuross 2003), differentiated between marine and C4 plants in diet in arid environments (Corr et al.
"Adaptations for omnivory may allow the bonnetheads to be generalists as opposed to strictly predators, giving them flexibility to consume both plants and protein," Leigh said.
A seventh-century Stockholm grave, for instance, was found to contain a Buddha statue, a tribute to the Vikings' long-distance contacts and religious omnivory. Indeed, some of this book's best evidence comes from archaeology, which better records the extent of North Sea trade than do the mostly Latin-centric written works of the time.
Stiller et al., "Isotopic evidence for omnivory among European cave bears: late Pleistocene Ursus spelaeus from the Pestera cu Oase, Romania," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol.
Feeding habits are also variable, with a predominance of omnivory within the family (Passamani 1995, Vieira & Astua de Moraes 2003, Caceres 2004, Gardner 2007, Rossi et al.
Results of Ley et al [31] indicated that both host diet and phylogeny influence bacterial diversity, which increased from carnivory to omnivory and then to herbivory.