oncogene

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on·co·gene

 (ŏn′kə-jēn, ŏng′-)
n.
1. Any of various mutated genes that cause the transformation of normal cells into cancerous cells.
2. Any of various viral genes that transform host cells into cancerous cells.

[Greek onkos, mass, tumor; see oncology + gene.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oncogene

(ˈɒŋkəʊˌdʒiːn)
n
(Genetics) any of several genes, first identified in viruses but present in all cells, that when abnormally activated can cause cancer
[C20 from Gk onkos mass, tumour + gene]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

on•co•gene

(ˈɒŋ kəˌdʒin)

n.
any gene that is a causative factor in the initiation of cancerous growth.
[1965–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

on·co·gene

(ŏn′kə-jēn)
A gene containing a mutation in its DNA that causes normal cells to turn into cancerous ones. See Note at cancer.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oncogene - a gene that disposes normal cells to change into cancerous tumor cellsoncogene - a gene that disposes normal cells to change into cancerous tumor cells
cistron, gene, factor - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Oncogenes harbor gain-of-function somatic mutations that are sufficient to transform normal cells into malignant ones.
The researchers scanned 1,000 human tumor samples for 238 known mutations in 17 specific oncogenes. These were chosen because they were mostly classic, well-known contributors to cancer.
According to the NYU, "the findings also showed that the algorithm may be applied to a wider class of problems including the detection of oncogenes, which promote the growth of cancer when they are mutated or overexpressed.
Tokyo, Japan, Feb 13, 2006 - (JCN) - The Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine has discovered that two different oncogenes KRAS and BRAF play a key role in the occurrence of cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome.
In contrast to HepaLife's PICM-19H, the cellular components of other artificial liver devices being developed to-date, have been based on freshly isolated porcine hepatocytes, cell lines established from human liver tumors, stem-cell-like cells prepared from fresh human adult liver tissue, and human or pig liver cells 'transformed' or 'immortalized' by the addition of oncogenes (i.e., genes associated with cancer) through genetic engineering.
Bishop and Varmus a few years earlier had cloned the first cellular oncogenes. Weinberg had cloned the ras oncogene, which was activated by chemicals and that was being studied by a number of different laboratories ...
Geneticist Dr Pier Paolo Pandolfi, from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in New York, who led the research team, said, 'There are a number of genes that can cause cancer, the so-called oncogenes, but Pokemon is unique in that it is needed for other oncogenes to cause cancer.
Though the human body contains an estimated 2,000 oncogenes, only several hundred have been identified.
Decades ago, cancer geneticists latched on to an attractively simple model in which only two types of genes control the disease's spread: Oncogenes trigger cancers and their growth, but tumor-suppressor genes keep cancer cells in check.
"Through this alliance with Avalon, Aventis hopes to generate innovative drugs targeting amplified oncogenes, a promising class of cancer drug targets."
Both the activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of tumor suppressor proteins are involved in these pathways.
The therapy section offers dosages, side effects and their management, clinical pearls, and special charts on such topics as liver biopsassociated with an increasing number of mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and mismatch repair genes.