ontological argument


Also found in: Wikipedia.

ontological argument

n
1. (Philosophy) the traditional a priori argument for the existence of God on the grounds that the concept itself necessitates existence. Compare cosmological argument, teleological argument
2. any analogous argument from the nature of some concept to the existence of whatever instantiates it
References in periodicals archive ?
When Kant refutes the ontological argument used by Descartes, the existence of the extended substance can no longer be guaranteed by reasoning alone.
Interestingly, Albert Camus once said: "I have never seen anyone die for the ontological argument.
Bonaventure, in turn, draws on the ontological argument to couch his exemplarist metaphysics in Franciscan terms; that is, in terms of the Incarnation.
By now we can see how Hegelian ontological argument fits to explain the dual relationship between the Taliban and Pakistan Army and the state.
The ontological argument would be one of the most momentous pages in the history of philosophy.
Among his topics are the divine attributes, Durkheim and God as the symbol of society, Anselm's ontological argument and Aquinas' dismissal of it, Descartes revives the ontological argument, the contingency and necessity arguments, evolution as an unassailable theory, the moral argument and why it fails, and theodicy.
Their entire project seems to depend in some fairly basic sense on the defensibility of some version of the ontological argument for the existence of God.
His basic ontological argument is that Nature should be kept as a realist concept concerning otherness that is distinct from culture.
Both arguments seek "a cause of the world's being a cosmos" but the ontological argument emphasizes "on order, design, and the adaptation of means to ends.
With regard to the specific philosophical hypothesis put forward by Kishik, his ontological argument constantly presupposes a meta-level, that of "the power of life itself, which can be seen as an inverted biopolitics" (35).
12) In conspicuous concord with the Reformed thinkers mentioned above, Collingwood appears to claim, in his analysis of the ontological argument, that a rational noetic structure can include belief in God as basic.
His ontological argument is as familiar to academics as a footnote.